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Great Day on the Links for 15th Annual Partners in Sports Scholarship Golf Tournament

Partners in Sports students
It was a great day for golf Monday, June 18, 2018, as the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences’ own Partners in Sports Student Organization hosted its 15th annual scholarship golf tournament. Gettysvue Polo, Golf, & Country Club once again was host as 96 golfers hit the links to show their support for Partners. The event grossed nearly $25,000 including sponsorships, gifts-in-kind, and silent auction proceeds. The winning team of Todd Wakefield, Luke Chill, Blair Reath, and Phil Iccus fired a 53 to take top honors. The team from Hops & Hollers defended its title it won last year.

There was a great turnout of program alumni as well. Participating this year:

Todd Batemen (2012)

Brad Briggs (2014)

Chad Culver (1999)

David Elliott (1992)

Lucas Forstrom (2013; 2016)

Jennifer Hall (2000; 2002)

Matt Hollifield (2013)

Todd Homer (1997)

Patrick Lawson (2010)

Frank Lett (2002)

Brent McMillan (2009)

Todd McMinn (1997; 1999)

Drew Sims (2013)

Allan Sitzler (2000)

Brandon Spurlock (2009)

Tucker Trent (2014)

Todd Wakefield (2008)

Partners in Sports founder, Buck Jones


Partners in Sports studentsGreat job by the Championship Committee on planning and excecuting the event. Emily Corley finished her stint as the Partners in Sports Graduate Assistant as she did a stellar job as tournament director. Emilee Howard and Stephanie Spencer managed the silent auction. Andrew Porth, Cade Ramsey, Henry Powell, and John Hendricks oversaw course operations. Thanks to the Visit Knoxville Sports Commission for coming on board as the title sponsor this year. Also, thanks to Tennessee Athletics, Steve Sams, Hops & Hollers, Chick-fil-A, Moe’s, and Allegiant Athletic Agency for their support of the tournament.

students in golf cart at partners in sports scholarship golf tournamentPartners in Sports is the student organization for Sport Management majors through the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies and other students at The University of Tennessee who are interested in pursuing careers in the sport or recreation industry. The organization is active within the university and region sports community. The mission of the organization is to create opportunities for tomorrow’s sports leaders through practical experiences and professional development opportunities.

CSPS Partnership Awarded ESPN Sports Humanitarian Award

CSPS Partnership Awarded ESPN Sports Humanitarian Award

On one of the premier stages celebrating the powerful impact of sport around the world, a partnership of UT’s College of Education, Health and Human Sciences’ Center for Sport, Peace, and Society has been named a Stuart Scott ENSPIRE Award honoree at ESPN’s Sports Humanitarian Awards.

The awards ceremony will take place July 17 in Los Angeles.

Sangeetha Manoharan of India (left) and Caroline Lembe of Belgium embrace during a teambuilding exercise. Both women were participants in the 2017 GSMP: Empower Women through Sports exchange.

“We are truly honored to receive one of the Stuart Scott ENSPIRE Awards, and appreciate so much our partnership with the US Department of State and espnW that made it possible,” said Sarah Hillyer, director of the CSPS. “Together and alongside brave and courageous women from all over the world, we are fulfilling our dream of leveraging the unique power of sport-based innovation to create a more equitable world for women and girls.

Established in honor of former ESPN commentator Stuart Scott, the ENSPIRE award honors the work of the Global Sports Mentoring Program (GSMP), a US Department of State and espnW initiative implemented by CSPS since its inception in 2012. The initiative has trained 99 international sports leaders from 53 countries during its gender-equality exchange programs. In addition to training participants in CSPS’s Better World curriculum, the center has partnered these leaders with female executive mentors at top organizations such as ESPN, Google, NHL, Big East Conference, and Saatchi. The center has collaborated with more than 110 mentors to support participants as they’ve developed plans for sport-based social change in their own communities, directly impacting more than 225,000 youth and women in the past six years.Aline Silva, an Olympic wrestler from Brazil, works with partner Malak Hasan, secretary general of the Palestinian Boxing Federation, during group fitness at Ambitious Athletics in Washington DC. Both women were participants in the 2017 GSMP: Empower Women through Sports exchange.

“When we conceived of what the GSMP could become, we believed wholeheartedly it had the potential to be more than a simple, government-funded program,” said Hillyer. “We envisioned a global movement of changemakers, mentors, and emerging leaders, who believe in the power and potential of sport as a tool for social change at every level of society. Today we can celebrate together because this change is happening.”

The finalists and winners for the award were determined by a selection committee, which included Nick Keller, founder and president of Beyond Sport; Donald Lassere, CEO of the Muhammad Ali Center; Benita Fitzgerald Mosley, CEO of Laureus Sport for Good Foundation USA; Sab Singh, founder of Sports Doing Good; and Eli Wolff, director of the Power of Sport Lab and Sport and Society Initiative at Brown University.

“The collective impact that this year’s Sports Humanitarian Award nominees have made in their communities is nothing short of extraordinary,” said Kevin Martinez, vice president of ESPN Corporate Citizenship. “From empowering youth through sports, to fighting for social change, to resourcing those in need, these honorees showcase the incredible power of sports.”

Participants in the 2017 GSMP: Empower Women through Sports exchange form a group hug during a teambuilding exercise at Terrapin Adventures in Savage, Md.Three GSMP alumnae will return to the United States to participate in the ceremony: Geraldine Bernardo, founder of the Sport Management Council of the Philippines (2012, Philippines); Dima Alardah, youth project coordinator for the Norwegian Refugee Council in Iraq (2014, Jordan); and Cynthia Coredo, program manager for Boxgirls Kenya (2015, Kenya).

“The CSPS provided the impetus and wherewithal that enabled me to launch my own sport-for-development programs in my country,” said Bernardo, who after participating in the GSMP returned home to launch two initiatives aimed at supporting vulnerable communities in the Philippines: Sports for Women’s Empowerment and Employment Program (SWEEP) as well as RePLAY, ReLIVE and ReCREATE—Building Community Resilience through Sports for Post-Disaster and Post-Conflict Areas.

“Even years later, the center continues to connect and involve the alumnae, ensuring that the ‘sisters’ will always have a web of support and opportunities for cross engagement.”

Highlights of the Sports Humanitarian Awards will be showcased during a one-hour program on ESPN, July 24, at 7 p.m. (ET). To learn more about the work of the CSPS, visit its website and social media channels: FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

 

mike wright speedo ninja & family post cover

KRSS Alumni Participant on NBC’s American Ninja Warrior

College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences alumni, Michael Wright, graduated from the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies (KRSS).  As the SEC 2011 Champion Diver in the one-meter springboard, Knoxville native Wright continues to push himself athletically.  And how does he show his support for The University of Tennessee and what it’s helped him accomplish? By proudly wearing his orange checkerboard while competing on American Ninja Warrior!

michael wright cehhs alumni competing on American Ninja WarriorWright graduated from KRSS with his Masters in Sport Psychology and continues to work in the diving industry as coach for a youth diving club, Tennessee Diving and as a volunteer assistant coach for UT Diving.

Be sure to follow Wright and cheer him on as he, a CEHHS alumni, demonstrates how completing your degree can help you achieve your dreams.  Read more about Wright and his journey on American Ninja Warrior.

Photo credit: Michael Hickey (NBC)

 

Dorian McCoy Project Grad

Project Grad 2018

 
The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences at the University of Tennessee hosted its 17th Project GRAD (Graduation Really Achieves Dreams) Summer Institute June 3-15th.  One hundred twenty-five students from Austin East and Fulton High Schools in Knox County were divided and participated in two separate week long residential experiences at the university under the guidance of Dorian McCoy & Shawn Spurgeon, Co-Directors of the Program.

2018 project grad student classProject Grad Summer Institute involves the students in a well-rounded experience of college life.  They begin their days with academic classes which include research skills, math, and complete the day by attending classes ranging from STEM (science, technology, education and mathematics) courses to sport and recreation management depending on their “academic track” of choice.

Students also participate in on and off campus recreational and social programs with Friday’s including some community service projects.  Students volunteer at local community agencies such as the Knoxville ReAnimation Coalition (Odd Fellows Cemetery), the Knoxville Area Rescue Mission (KARM) and the Wesley House.  Other activities included painting the rock and laser tag at the end of a long week.

project grad community service

project grad student 2018 playing laser tag

project grad community service old fellows cemetary

project grad 2018 students paint the rock


Recently, Project Grad has been the topic of many debates with the Knox County Board of Education.  Parents from both schools spoke up about the difference the program has made in their students life. Currently, a proposal is under under review for funding for next year.  Project Grad relies upon funding from Knox County and the help of multiple community partners to make it possible.  This opportunity, presented to those students who otherwise would not attend college, has made a significant impact upon graduation rates.

For more information on Project Grad and dates for 2019, you can contact the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.

All photos courtesy of Astute Lenz Photography.  Photos from the two week camp are available here:

Week 1

Week 2

 

 

black travelers studying map

Benjamin Co-Author’s Paper Shortlisted for Best Paper Award at TTRA International Conference

 
Stefanie Benjamin, assistant professor in Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences, co-authored a paper, “Tweeting the Black Experience- Social media counter-narratives Stories as Innovative Insight on #TravelingWhileBlack.”  The paper was submitted to the Travel and Tourism Research Association (TTRA) International Conference and has been shortlisted for the Best Paper Award for which it is quite an honor to even be nominated. The TTRA is a leading advocate for higher standers in travel and tourism-related research, analysis, and marketing.

Benjamin co-authored the paper with Alana Dillette, San Diego State University and Chelsea Carpenter, a senior in Marketing at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, which she mentored during the 2017 Summer Research Institute.  The paper is currently under revision with the Journal of Travel Research, a top tier tourism journal.  The trio will present their research at the end of June at the 2018 TTRA International Conference in Miami/Coral Gables, Florida.

pizza being cut

Raynor Featured in Washington Post

The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences’ own Hollie Raynor, Interim Assistant Dean for Research and Professor in the Department of Nutrition, is featured in the Washington Post in an article focused upon weekend eating habits, “Friday Night is Pizza Night. How Weekend Choices Undermine our Kid’s Healthy Eating Habits.”

Hollie RaynorAccording to the article, those Friday night pizza nights don’t always fit into our normally healthy lifestyles and eating habits.  Raynor, in a research study in 2011, believes the difference relies on the lack of structure on weekends in comparison to weekdays. Raynor’s studies also find that children watch twice as much TV on weekends.  These two changes can pattern poor food habits which will can carry over into adulthood and contribute to childhood and adult obesity.

Raynor holds an MS in Public Health Nutrition and a PhD in Clinical Psychology.  She is also a registered dietitian who conducts research in lifestyle interventions for pediatric and adult weight management.

ut football stadium

CEHHS Sport Management Program Ranked 26th in the World by SportBusiness

The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences Sport Management master’s program through the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation and Sports Studies has received high rankings by SportBusiness; an online ratings group for the sports sector.

According to the 2018 post graduate course rankings, the Sports Management master’s program has been ranked 26th in the world out of 100.  The program was given a 72.53% ranking out of a hundred based upon class size, class duration, language, work placement, average age, student gender and nationality, and employment placement.

Contact the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation and Sports Studies Graduate Admissions Coordinator, Scott Smith or Lars Dzikus, Director of Graduate Studies, for more information on applying to the program.

 

Pipes summer camp students with body

PIPES: Possibilities in Postsecondary Education Holds Summer Camp

 
pipes summer camp student holding brainThe PIPES: Possibilities in Postsecondary Education project in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences held its annual Summer Camp the week of June 4, 2018.  Students from Campbell and Union counties were invited to experience life at the University of Tennessee including visits to the science and engineering labs.  Students from tenth- and eleventh-grades enrolled in camp have the opportunity to explore STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math and Medical Science) careers and become college aware.

The PIPES project is funded by a Science Education Partnership Award from National Institutes of Health. The project is directed by Melinda Gibbons, Educational Psychology & Counseling along with Erin Hardin, Psychology.  Graduate students and other key personnel help make the camp possible.

 

Pond Gap Elementary Krystal Foundation Grant

University Assisted Community Schools Awarded Grant Funding by Krystal

 
The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences’ University Assisted Community School (UACS) has been awarded a grant from the Krystal Foundation.  The “Squaring Up Support For Our Communities” mission is to help provide funding and grants for programs devoted to STEAM; Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics, Culinary Arts, Music and Sports.  Working with non-profit and community organizations such as the UACS, allows Krystal to help keep programs in schools where they already exist and get things started in schools eager to offer these valuable educational experiences.

Pond Gap Krystal DonationThe UACS will use the funding to support their Kids Cook Healthy Cooking Club at Pond Gap Elementary.  Pond Gap is located in an economically disadvantaged community where 100% of their students receive free breakfast and lunch.  With the funding from the Krystal Foundation, the students will experience how to try, prepare and eat new foods while experiencing real life application of math and science skills.

 

Chandra Harris-McCray, WPI Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship Recipient

Phd Student in ELPS Awarded Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship

 

The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences congratulates Educational Leadership and Policy Studies PhD student, Chandra Harris-McCray.  Chandra is the 2018 WPI Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship Recipient.  The goals of the fellowship are to increase research and understanding of gender and philanthropy, contribute to building the field of study of gender and philanthropy, and support and encourage emerging scholars in their study of gender and philanthropy.

Read more about Chandra’s argument and significant contributions her dissertation will make to women’s philanthropy. 

Congratulations Chandra!

 

 

 

Robert L. Williams, Receipient of the Joe Johnson Lifetime Achievement Award

Robert L. Williams Awarded the Joe Johnson Lifetime Achievement Award

If you ever pursued a major in any education program in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences (CEHHS) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, chances are you had this professor’s class.  He’s been with the university since 1967 and has taught a multitude of students about psychoeducational issues in human development and he’s still going strong!

CEHHS congratulates Robert L. Williams, Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling (EPC)  who was presented with the Joe Johnson Lifetime Achievement Award.  This award is presented by the President of the University to those who have 50 or more years of service.  Williams has worked in the EPC department through multiple name and organizational changes. He has received numerous awards throughout his years of teaching, written several books and over 140 research articles. A native of McMinn County, Williams began his education in one-room rural school across the road from his family farm and went on to graduate with his PhD in Educational Psychology in 1965 from what is now Vanderbilt University.

Read more about Robert L. Williams as shared from his department, EPC.  Also, enjoy this article from his hometown newspaper, The Daily Post-Athenian.Com.

 

 

early learning center logo

Early Learning Center Hosted 2018 Early Learning Institute

 
Each year, the Early Learning Center in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences (CEHHS) hosts the Early Learning Institute.  The institute is an intimate and engaging professional development experience for early childhood professionals interested in inquiry and nature-based learning.

This year’s event was June 1 & 2nd and featured Mary Jane Moran, newly appointed department head for Child & Family Studies in CEHHS, as one of the featured speakers.  Also featured was Bob Coulter, director of the Litzsinger Road Ecology Center in St. Louis, Missouri.  Read more about the featured speakers.

The Early Learning Center, supported by parent fee revenues and university funds, provides learning environments for young children six weeks through kindergarten as well as the academic support of more than one hundred students enrolled annually in Child and Family studies coursework and educators from the broader community of early childhood education.

cehhs wall painted

CEHHS Leadership Academy Announces 2018-19 Fellows

The UT Leadership Academy has announced its class of fellows for the 2018–19 academic year. Now in its ninth year, the academy prepares talented educators from East Tennessee to become school principals. This year’s cohort includes educators from nine school districts—Anderson County, Blount County, Bristol City, Claiborne County, Jefferson County, Kingsport City, Lenoir City, Morgan County, and Union County.

The full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program is a part of UT’s Center for Educational Leadership and is based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences.

Starting this August, Leadership Academy fellows will spend four days a week working in a school with an experienced mentor principal. The fifth day will be spent in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.

Learn more about this year’s fellows.  You may also check out the story as shared on WBIR.Com.

weight-loss-scale-apple

Raynor Combats Obesity with Prevention Plus Program

Hollie Raynor
The Prevention Plus Program (PP), implemented by Hollie Raynor, interim assistant dean and professor of nutrition, is recommended for childhood obesity within a primary care setting. With obesity levels in children age 4 to 10 years at approximately 42%, Raynor knew it was time to make a change for these children to prevent higher risks of health issues as they mature.

Read more about the PP program and the goals being explored in relationship to the household food security status with and without caretakers.  In agreement with Cherokee Health System’s primary care providers, Raynor hopes that implementing the PP program will make a difference in improving weight status in young children.

travel the world globe in hand image

Ask the Expert: Jeremy Whaley, RHTM Offers Advice on Summer Travel via WalletHub.com

jeremy whaley assistant professor in retail hospitality and tourism management

Where should you travel this summer? The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences’ own Jeremy Whaley, assistant professor in Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management,  shares his expert advice with WalletHub.Com. The article, 2018’s Best Summer Travel Deals, features Whaley’s advice on issues such as federal government blocking of overbooked flights to the most costly travel mistakes.

 

David Bassett

David Bassett, Jr. to Receive Citation Award from American College of Sports Medicine

The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences is proud to share that David Bassett, Jr., Professor and Department Head of the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies, has received the Citation Award from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).

Bassett’s primary research area is physical activity (PA) and energy expenditure in humans, with a particular focus on the measurement of PA.  His work has been published in the best journals and he is in high demand as a speaker at both national an international levels.  He has over 169 refereed publications with most in high impact journals and has published more than 30 studies dealing with the issues of how differences in levels of PA within and between populations are linked to health outcomes.

Bassett will be honored on June 1st at the 2018 ACSM’s 65th Annual Meeting and Banquet being held in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  CEHHS congratulates you on receiving such a prestigious award!

Julia Jaekel & Ann Skadberg, Andrew D. Holt Endowed Professorship

CEHHS Alumna Endows Professorship in Honor of her Father Andy Holt

Ann Skadberg, CEHHS alumna, and her husband Dean, have established the Andrew D. Holt Endowed Professorship in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences.

The endowed professorship was awarded at the 2018 Faculty and Staff Recognition Ceremony.  Julia Jaekel, Child and Family Studies, was the honored inaugural recipient.

Ann currently serves on the Dean’s Board of Advisors and works to continue the mission of academic excellence and dedication to teaching, service and research that her father established.

Read more about the endowment and the legacy of Andy Holt at the university which continues to live on through the Skadbergs.

shadow people standing in group

2018-19 Cohort of the University of Tennessee’s Leadership Academy to be Announced

 
The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences’ (CEHHS) Cohort for the 2018-19 Leadership Academy will be announced May 30th at 3:00 P.M.  The event will take place at the Joint Institute for Advanced Materials Building, Room 310, Cherokee Farm Campus.The new fellows and mentors will spend the morning getting oriented to the program before the announcement with classes beginning on May 31st.

The Leadership Academy, through the Center for Educational Leadership in CEHHS, is an extensive 15-month residency fellowship that prepares potential aspiring principals for the rigors of instructional leadership in the educational context.  Fellows spend 4 days a week in a school working with an effective mentor principal, and attend graduate-level classes and seminars on the 5th day at the University of Tennessee.

Learn more about the Leadership Academy, how to apply, info about the current fellows and alumni of the academy here.

Hollie Raynor

Raynor Receives the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Excellence in Practice-Dietetic Research Award

The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences congratulates Hollie Raynor, Interim Assistant Dean for Research and professor in the Department of Nutrition.  Raynor has been selected to receive the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Excellence in Practice – Dietetic Research Award. This award recognizes an outstanding registered dietitian nutritionist who has demonstrated excellence and leadership in this specific area of practice.  Raynor’s award will be presented at the Academy’s 2018 Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo in Washington, D.C., at the “Transforming Daily Clinical Practice into Useful Data” session on Monday, October 22, 2018.

 

Jeffrey Fairbrother Education, Health & Human Sciences

Fairbrother Presented the 2018-2019 Southeastern Conference Academic Leadership Development Program Alumni Fellowship

 

The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences is proud to share that Jeffrey T. Fairbrother, PhD, Associate Dean of Academic and Faculty Affairs, has been awarded the 2018-2019 Southeastern Conference Academic Leadership Development Program (SEC ALDP) Alumni Fellowship.  Fairbrother was one of two SEC ALDP alumni from all SEC schools to receive the award this year.

SECU, The Academic Initiative of the SECThe SEC Academic Leadership Development Program (SEC ALDP) Alumni Fellowship is designed for individuals who are in senior leadership positions at SEC universities (i.e.,home institution).

The aim of the fellowship is to provide opportunities at other SEC universities that allow recipients to strengthen their professional experience and deepen their knowledge in a specific area of administrative leadership that is of interest to the fellow and the fellow’s home institution.

Fairbrother’s project is to examine communications about expectations as they are conveyed during hiring, mentoring, and evaluation of tenure-line faculty members.

 

Anton Reece Commencement 2018 Speaker With Sherry Bell, Acting Dean

2018 CEHHS Commencement Speaker: Anton Reece

Few speakers can captivate, touch, motivate, and challenge varied audiences as West Kentucky Community and Technical College (WKCTC) President Dr. Anton Reece. For the past 28 years, Reece has spoken to over 600 audiences in New York, Texas, Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Arizona. These speaking engagements include corporations, colleges, high schools, youth organizations, churches, and prisons and have provided him with critical material to empower others. All of these are illuminated by his rich style of articulation and homespun humor. Hailing from the Caribbean country of Barbados, Reece draws from his communication roots and skills as a former employee with the Voice of Barbados Radio and a guest anchor for the Caribbean Broadcasting Television news. In addition, he was a regular guest on WPSD TV, WKYX radio, host on Channel 2 Minority Focus, and commentator on various television and radio programs.

Reece is an honors graduate with a BA in broadcasting news and an MA in counseling student personnel from Eastern Kentucky University. He earned a PhD in educational psychology and research from UT. He spent 13 years at UT serving in various roles including coordinator of academic support, director of student activities, associate vice provost of student success, and director of the Student Success Center. Reece has a legacy of trailblazing as the first minority affairs coordinator in the University of Kentucky Community College System in 1990. From 1999–2003, he made history again by becoming the first African American dean of student affairs in Paducah Community College/Paducah Junior College history. In October 2016, Reece achieved a historic appointment as the first African American and second president of WKCTC. WKCTC is a four-time Aspen Institute finalist and currently ranks in the top 10 nationally among the nation’s 1,100 community and technical colleges.

Reece has received many awards, including UT’s College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences Educators Hall of Honor recognition, UT Dean of Students Leadership Award, UT Commission for Blacks Outstanding Service Award, EKU President’s Award for Academic Excellence, the EKU Earl Combs Outstanding Student-Athlete, the PCC Presidential Leadership Award, Academic All-American, 1982 Hampton Games International track gold medalist in the triple jump, distinguished speaker awards from many colleges and organizations, and featured in the Success Guide Magazine as an outstanding leader. He was presented the Distinguished Alumnus Award in recognition of his outstanding service to the profession and as a distinguished ambassador of the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences during the commencement ceremonies. He gave all praise to God for his recognition and the opportunity to serve and touch others from all backgrounds of life. Reece is married to Cornelia Reece and has two daughters, Tina and Kiana.

CEHHS Student Semi-Finalist in UT’s Graduate School’s 3MT Competition [Highlight Video]

Tsz-Chui, RD in Public Health Nutrition and a master’s candidate and graduate research assistant in the Department of Nutrition in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences was named a semi-finalist in UT’s Graduate School 3MT (Three Minute Thesis) Competition.

Twelve finalists were chosen to compete in a final competition that took place on April 6, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. in Hollingsworth Auditorium. This was one of the capstone events of Graduate and Professional Student Appreciation Week. Anyone preparing a master’s thesis, doctoral dissertation, or who play a major role in research-based projects (including case studies) was eligible to apply and be selected to participate. WHAT IS THE 3MT Competition? Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a research communication competition originally developed by The University of Queensland in 2008, and now has been widely adopted at universities around the world. The exercise challenges masters and doctoral students to present a compelling talk on their Thesis/Dissertation topic and its significance. Many theses and dissertations can be over 80,000 words and take hours to present, but students in this competition have just three minutes and one slide to convey their often highly-technical research to a lay audience. Presentations are judged by two main criteria: comprehension/content and engagement. Did the presentation help the audience (who may have no background at all in the research area) understand the topic? Did the method of presentation make the audience want to know more?

Lynn Hodge

Hodge Awarded $1.4 Million NSF Grant to Further STEM Education

 
CEHHS congratulates Lynn Hodge, Associate Professor of Math Education in the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education. Hodge was awarded a $1.4 million grant through the National Science Foundation Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program. The grant will be used to recruit and prepare secondary science and mathematics teachers in the Appalachian region of Tennessee.

The National Science Foundation Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program seeks to encourage talented science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors and professionals to become K-12 mathematics and science (including engineering and computer science) teachers. The program invites creative and innovative proposals that address the critical need for recruiting and preparing highly effective elementary and secondary science and mathematics teachers in high-need local educational agencies.

Read more about Hodge’s grant here.

Vincent Price, PhD

CEHHS PhD graduate gives commencement speech for UT Graduate Hooding

Vincent Price received his PhD in teacher education with a focus on the teaching of black literature, having already received an MS in teacher education from UT. He came to us from the University of Southern Mississippi, where he earned his BA in English, with a minor in French. He is looking forward to taking what he has learned here at Rocky Top to high schools in Beaumont, Texas.

He knew early on that he was going to go to graduate school but took time after receiving his undergraduate degree to teach at the high-school level in his hometown of Vicksburg, Mississippi. During the four-and-a-half years he spent teaching in grades 9–12, he strove to bring black literature into the classroom whenever possible. This passion for increasing the amount of black literature taught in schools has clearly been a major theme throughout his master’s and PhD research programs.

While in his graduate program at UT, Price published a paper in the journal Changing English, titled “Flipping the Coin: Towards a Double-Faced Approach to Teaching Black Literature in Secondary English Classrooms.” He has also presented at events such as the New Directions in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies Conference and at the Literacy Research Association’s 66th annual conference as part of the Critical Race Theory Study Group. He served as the public relations officer for the Multicultural Graduate Student Organization from 2014 to 2016 and remains an active member.

By his own admission, Price enjoys expanding his comfort zone. He earned first place in the 2017 3MT competition at UT and went on to receive the People’s Choice Award at the regional competition. He began taking ballroom dance classes during his master’s program and has expanded his repertoire during his PhD program, learning tango, salsa, bachata, and tap dancing. Adding Spanish, piano, and skating to his list of new endeavors, Price finds many ways to balance his work with a discovery of what else life has to challenge him.

CEHHS Recognizes Top Grad Elizabeth Elajam

The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences (CEHHS) is excited to recognize our third Top Grad, Elizabeth Elajam. Elizabeth majored in Kinesiology.

“I was born and raised in Knoxville Tennessee, and from a young age, I was extremely interested in attending the University of Tennessee. UT is a large school with many major options, fantastic opportunities, invested professors, and many other faculty members who are looking to help prepare each of us for the workforce, and I couldn’t be more appreciative to the staff and how they have helped me feel ready for the next step. As a child, I took field trips to Clarence Brown Theatre, went to numerous ceremonies in Thompson Bolling Arena, and like many Knoxville residents, spent my Saturdays watching the Vols take the field in Neyland or elsewhere. It just made sense once I reached the age to start applying for college to apply to UT.

On campus, I am the president of the Christian Student Fellowship (CSF) and spend time coordinating service events in the community (most notably at KARM), and creating events for new students to find a group on campus to experience college with, and to just challenge each other to be better people.

Off campus, I used my knowledge of Spanish (largely acquired through the language department here) to volunteer on mission trips to Central America as a translator. Additionally, I have also used the language proficiency to translate at UT Medical Center where I worked as a CNA while attending UT.

I have recently been accepted to South College’s PA program where I will begin in October and will complete the 27-month program to becoming a PA. I hope to work in either emergency medicine or pediatrics after graduating from PA school. I also have aspirations of continuing to do international work with my medical license in the future.”

CEHHS is so excited to see all of the wonderful things Elizabeth will accomplish. Great job Elizabeth!

 

CEHHS TOP GRAD Mandy Tenille

Mandy Tennille Recognized as CEHHS Top Grad

 
The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences (CEHHS) wants to recognize another one of our Top Grads, Mandy Tennille. Mandy majored in Child and Family Studies with a concentration in the PreK-3rd grade teacher licensure program.

“I’ve spent most of my life in Franklin, TN, and choosing to come to UT was such an easy decision! With a long-term goal of teaching, UT’s teacher preparation program was appealing both because of the many hands-on teaching experiences it provides and because of the opportunity to concentrate my studies on the younger elementary grades I hope to teach through the Child and Family Studies PreK-3 Program.                                       

Over the past four years, I spent time working in several campus departments, including Student Disabilities Services, Office of Information Technology as a Lab Services Student Assistant, and in UT’s Early Learning Center for Research and Practice as a Student Educator and Summer Camp Counselor. I have also enjoyed spending time cheering on the Vols at UT sporting events! 

Next year, I will complete a student teaching internship in a Knox County school with hopes to earn my certification to teach PreK-3rd grade and a Master of Science degree in Child and Family Studies. Following this, I aspire to have my own classroom to be able to use all of the child-centered practices I have learned to guide young children to grow as both people and learners! I appreciate all of the opportunities and experiences UT, CEHHS, and Child and Family Studies have provided. It¹s great to be a Tennessee Vol!”

Great work Mandy! CEHHS is so proud of you and excited to see what you will do in the future! 

basket of fruits and veggies

Public Health Nutrition Policy Team Are 2018 Howard Baker Center Grand Policy Challenge Winners

 
The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences (CEHHS) congratulates the Fresh Food for All Public Health Nutrition Policy Team from the Departments of Nutrition and Public Health in our college. Chosen unanimously, the 2018 Howard Baker Grand Policy Challenge winners include Chelsea Allison, Marleah Payne, and Marissa Black from the Department of Nutrition and Jennifer Russomanno from the Department of Public Health.

The award winning team presented a policy solution which focused on improving the 2018 WIC (Women, Infants & Children) Farmer’s Market Nutrition Program (FMNP) redemption rates in Knox County. They were awarded $3,000 which will go toward the implementation of their project.

The Howard Baker Grand Policy Challenge is a challenging, fun, educational research program that requires a semester-long commitment.  Winners are chosen by a team of experts and are awarded cash prizes to further their proposed policy solutions. Learn more about the award winning team.

Congratulations on your hard work!

CEHHS Celebrates Top Graduate, Olivia Herd

 
The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences (CEHHS) is excited to announce one of our top graduates, Olivia Herd. Olivia majored in Audiology and Speech Pathology through a joint program offered by Theory and Practice in Teacher Education and the UT Health Science Center.

“I am from Belvidere, Tennessee where I attended Franklin County High School. I have attended UT as a Chancellor’s Thomas D. Dunlap Scholar and am a member of several honors societies such as Phi Eta Sigma, The National Society of Leadership and Success, and National Student Speech Language Hearing Association.

The University of Tennessee has provided me many on and off campus opportunities to serve the community and develop my career interests. I have pursued my passion for community outreach by leading a construction and aid trip to Thomonde, Haiti in the Spring of 2016 and by volunteering as a mentor and tutor at Inskip Elementary through the University-Assisted Community Schools Program.

I have explored my interests within the field of speech pathology by volunteering as an undergraduate researcher in the Autism Social Development and Friendship Lab. I look forward to continuing my educational career at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Fall of 2018 as I pursue my Master of Science degree in speech-language pathology.”

Olivia, CEHHS is so proud of you. We know you will go on to do incredible work to enhance the lives of others! Congratulations!

rhtm students at Appalachian Fundraiser

Sixteenth Annual Appalachian Spring Fundraiser

The Department of Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management celebrated its sixteenth annual silent auction and fundraising dinner, Appalachian Spring, on April 6th, 2018. The retail and hospitality students assisted in planning, preparing and executing the large-scale production event as part of the Advance Event Planning class and as student volunteers. The “For Students – By Students” fundraiser has generated more than $80,000 in the past three years with 100% of the proceeds awarded as student scholarships to help support those who study abroad or engage in experiential learning activities. Such activities include attending the HX (Hotel Experience) and the NRF Big Show (National Retail Federation) in New York City.

mary celeste beallAppalachian Spring Fundraiser celebrates leaders and trailblazers within retail, restaurant, hospitality and tourism industries. This year we honored the inspiration of the late Sam Beall, former proprietor of Blackberry Farm and celebrated his passion towards raising the bar of hospitality and authentic high-standard of service. Guests of the evening heard beautiful and inspiring stories of Sam on how he infused positive thinking in family, work, life and play from his widow, Mary Celeste Beall, current proprietor of Blackberry Farm and several of his long-time employees and friends also considered family of Blackberry Farm.  Brian Lee, General Manager of Blackberry Farm and RHTM alumni ’92, was the gracious Emcee of the evening with six of our student leaders delivering details of the five-course exquisite gourmet menu, also inspired by Blackberry Farm with seasonal flavors and exceptional wine-pairing.

rhtm studentsEach year, the event features a silent auction with one-of-a-kind experiences, beautiful items and unique packages, delicious hors-d’oeuvres and a complimentary cocktail hour.  To donate an item for the silent auction, or to reserve your seat for Appalachian Spring 2019, please contact Jeremy E. Whaley (jwhale15@utk.edu) or Mrs. Myra Loveday (mloveda4@utk.edu), who are the instructors of the annual event.

CEHHS Awards Ceremony Plaques

CEHHS Annual Faculty & Staff Recognition Ceremony

The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences held its Annual Faculty and Staff Recognition Ceremony on Wednesday, April 25th in the Hollingsworth Auditorium on the Agriculture Campus to celebrate the conclusion of another successful academic year.

Recipients of recognition at this year’s events are:

  • Mary Helen Byers Award – Recipient: Lee Murphy Awarded to a faculty member or team in the Department of Nutrition to promote the College’s mission through innovative teaching.
  • Frances Speight Clark Award – Recipient:  Kristina Kintziger Used for faculty enrichment and development in the health or human sciences areas of Child and Family Studies; Nutrition; Public Health; or Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management.
  • Irma Fitch Giffels Award – Recipient: Heidi Stolz Awarded to a faculty member in the health or human sciences areas of Child and Family Studies; Nutrition; Public Health; or Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management.  This award is based on superlative research, teaching, or service.
  • John Tunstall Outstanding Faculty Award – Recipient: Sherry Bell Awarded to an outstanding faculty member who is involved in the preparation of teachers, administrators, or others entering the field of education. The faculty member shall have a distinguished record in teaching, research, or community service or any combination of the three.
  • John Tunstall Outstanding Staff Award – Recipient:  Teresa Allmon Awarded annually to a staff member who has executed their duties in an exemplary manner in support of those programs which prepare “teachers, administrators, or others entering the field of education.”
  • Helen B. Watson Outstanding Faculty Research Award – Recipient:  Louis Rocconi  Awarded to a full-time faculty member or team within the departments of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies; Edu­cational Psychology and Counseling; Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies; or Theory and Practice in Teacher Education.
  • Helen B. Watson Faculty/Student Award for Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation   Student Recipient: Allison Smith    Faculty Recipient: Robin Hardin Awarded to a student and the faculty member who directed the outstanding doctoral dissertation within the departments of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies; Educational Psychology and Counseling; Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies; or Theory and Practice in Teacher Education.
  • Faculty Mentoring Award – Recipient:  Steven Waller Awarded to a faculty member who has mentored other faculty, especially  tenure-track faculty, providing counsel, guidance, support and encouragement in their department, the college, and/or the university.
  • Departmental Staff Award – Recipient:  Wendy Smith Recognizes a department-level non-exempt staff person who has provided exceptional contributions to his/her department (going above and beyond job expectations to accommodate students and faculty, contributing to a positive and supportive work culture and environment).
  • Jacquelyn Orlando DeJonge Faculty Award – Recipient: Heidi Stolz Awarded to a faculty member in the health or human sciences areas of Child and Family Studies; Nutrition; Public Health; or Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management.  This award is based on superlative research, teaching, or service.
  • Louie M. and Betty M. Phillips Faculty Support in Education Award Recipient: Melinda Gibbons Awarded to a faculty member in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences related to the preparation of teachers involved in K-12 education.  This award serves to highlight outstanding research and teaching efforts.
  • Frank W. Harvey Professorship – Recipient: Lynn Hodge Awarded to a faculty member who exhibits excellence in teaching secondary education.
  • Dr. Andrew D. Holt Endowed Professorship – Recipient: Julia Jaekel Awarded to a faculty member who exemplifies the values, embraces the vision, and executes the mission of the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences through providing academic excellence to the undergraduate and graduates with whom they interact.  As research can positively impact the academic careers of all students, preference shall be given to faculty who demonstrate distinction in this area.
  • CEHHS Board of Advisors Excellence in Outreach and Engagement Award – Recipient: Angela Wozencroft Awarded to a faculty or staff member in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences who has provided exemplary leadership and service in the area of outreach, engagement, and service learning.
  • CEHHS Board of Advisors Faculty Support Award – Recipient: Gary Skolits Awarded to recognize current/past accomplishments or future projects of one outstanding faculty member for teaching/research/service efforts in any area within CEHHS.
  • Pamela Angelle, Editor, Special Issue Journal, Organizational Influences of Teacher Leadership. International Studies in Educational Administration
  • Stergios Botzakis, Co-Editor, American Reading Forum Yearbook
  • Guoxun Chen, Guest Editor, Cholesterol. Advances on the Relationship between Circulating Cholesterol and Cardiovascular Disease and the Influence of Diets and Natural Products (RCHACD)
  • Scott Crouter, Associate Editor, Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise
  • Patricia Davis-Wiley, Founder and Editor, The TFLTA Journal
  • Mary Lynne Derrington, Co-Editor, Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. Special Issue: Improving Teacher Evaluation: Key Issues for Appraisers in a Globalized Era
  • Paul Erwin, Associate Editor, American Journal of Public Health
  • Robin Hardin, Editor, Sport Management Education Journal
  • Adam Love, Editor, Engaging Sports
  • Steve McCallum, Co-Founder and Consulting Editor, Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, Sage Publishing Company
  • Hollie Raynor, Editor, Appetite, European Journal of Nutrition, Behavioral Medicine
  • Gary Skolits, Co-Editor, The Qualitiative Review
  • Qi Sun, Co-Editor, Adult Education Quarterly
  • Barbara Thayer-Bacon, Editor-in-Chief, Studies in Philosophy of Education
  • Nora Vines, Co-Editor, American Reading Forum Yearbook
  • Steven Waller, Co-Editor, Diversity and Inclusion, International Journal of Aquatics Research and Education
  • Stewart Waters, Associate Editor, Journal of Social Studies Research
  • Akpovo, S. M., Moran, M. J., & Brookshire, R. (Eds.). (2018). Collaborative Cross-Cultural Research Methodologies in Early Care and Education Contexts. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Angelle, P. S. (Ed.). (2017). A Global Perspective of Social Justice Leadership for School Principals. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Biddix, P. J. (2018). Research Methods and Applications for Student Affairs. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Kronick, R. F. (2018). Community Engagement: Principles, Strategies, and Practices. Hauppague, NY: Nova Science Publishers.
  • Kronick, R. F., & Basma, D. (2017). Wicked Problems and the Community School Solution. Hauppague, NY: Nova Science Publishers.
  • Casey Barrio-Minton, President, Southern Association for Counselor Education and Supervision
  • Lisa Driscoll, President, National Education Finance Academy
  • Adam Love, President, Applied Sport Management Association
  • Marsha Spence, President, Association of Graduate Programs in Public Health Nutrition
  • Steven Waller, President, Christian Society for Kinesiology, Leisure, and Sport Studies
  • David Bassett, Citation Award, American College of Sports Medicine
  • Pamelia Brott, Fellow, National Career Development Association
  • Melinda Gibbons, Counseling Vision and Innovation Award, Association for Counselor Education and Supervision
  • Megan Haselchwerdt, Cindy Winter Scholarship Award, National Council on Family Relations
  • Nils Jaekel, Outstanding Article of the Year, The Language Learning Journal
  • Elizabeth Johnson, Outstanding Scholarship Article, Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences
  • Bob Kronick, Counselor Educator of the Year, American  Mental Health Counseling Association
  • Amy Rauer, Top 5% Reviewer,Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
  • Qi Sun, Outstanding Service Award, The American Association of Adult and Continuing Education
  • Steven Waller, Literary Award, Christian Society for Kinesiology, Leisure, and Sport Studies
  • Lisa Yamagata-Lynch and Craig Howard, Distance Learning Best Practice Award, Association for Educational Communications and Technology Division

  • Excellence in Advising – Recipients: Lucy Simpson & Jana Spitzer Bestowed by the Office of the Chancellor and the Teaching Council of the Faculty Senate to honor outstanding work in advising.
  • Excellence in Teaching – Recipient: Lars Dzikus Bestowed by the Office of the Chancellor and the Teaching Council of the Faculty Senate to honor outstanding work in the classroom.
  • Hardy Liston Jr. Symbol of Hope Award – Recipient: Steven Waller Goes to a faculty member, staff member, or friend of the university who demonstrates a commitment to diversity, multiculturalism, and appreciation of the differences in people and cultures on our campus.
  • Research and Creative Achievement – Recipient: Melinda Gibbons Honors are bestowed to senior faculty in recognition of excellence in research, scholarship, and creative achievement.
  • Ahmed Bettaieb, HHS-NIH-NIDDK-National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases $239,812
  • Ernest Brewer:
    • Academic Enrichment Upward Bound, US Department of Education, $358,115
    • Educational Opportunity Center, US Department of Education, $476,833
    • Academic Enrichment Upward Bound, US Department of Education, $358,115
    • Educational Opportunity Center, US Department of Education, $476,833
    • Math Science Upward Bound, US Department of Education, $313,594
    • Pre-College Upward Bound, US Department of Education, $398,231
    • Veterans Upward Bound, US Department of Education, $333,528
  • Stephanie Cowherd, TN DHS-DRS, Tennessee Department of Human Services, Division of Rehabilitation Services, $797,060
  • Lisa Crawford:
    • Coordinated School Health Events, Tennessee Department of Education, $270,759
    • Partners in Education (PIE) Conference Support, Tennessee Department of Education, $1,308,909
    • TDOE Summer Trainings, Tennessee Department of Education, $621,980
  • Sarah Hillyer, Better World: Empowering Global Change Agents through Sports, US Department of States, $1,130,000
  • James McIntyre, Advocacy-Score Strategic Planning Work (Targeted Innovation Efforts), State Collaborative on Reforming Education, $450,34
  • David Smith:
    • Tennessee Education of the Deaf (TENNEDDE) Personnel Preparation Project: Focus Area B: Preparing personnel to serve school-age children with low-incidence disabilities, US Department of Education, $500,000
    • Tennessee Universal Newborn Screening and Intervention Program, Tennessee Department of Health, $300,000
  • Kimberly Wolbers, An Efficacy Study of Strategic and Interactive Writing Instruction (SIWI): Teacher development and student outcomes, Institute of Education Sciences, $711,356
  •  Amy Ferguson
    • Fall 2017, UTK Graduate School Award
    • June 2018, UT Customer Relations & Communication Certificate
    • April 2018, Certified Administrative Professional CAP Exam
  • Sally Hunter, May 2018, NACADA Global Community for Academic Advising, Winner of Region 3 Excellence in Advising-Faculty Advisor
  • Jordan Murphy, May 2018, UT Customer Relations & Communication Certificate
  • Sonja Spell, May 218, HR Processes Certificate
  • Meagan Spillers, December 2017, Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, University of Tennessee
  • 5 Years
    • Jessica Adkins
    • Travis Burnett
    • Synthia Clark
    • Venetia Cornett
    • Casey Darby
    • Christine DePirro
  •  10 Years
    • Laura Brown
  •  15 Years
    • Tammi Basile
    • Leigh Elkins
    • Gina Guinn
    • Teresa Smith
    • Victoria Thal
  • 20 Years
    • John Dever
    • Karlin Green
    • Constance Honorable
    • Marcia Lane
    • Duren Thompson
  • 30 Years
    • Debbie Archdale
  • CAPS Outreach Center
    • Karlin Green, 1997-2017
  • CEHHS Administration
    • Susan Benner, 1980-2017
  •  Child and Family Studies
    • Sandra Russell, 2003-2017
  • Office of Professional Licensure
    • Bill Wishart, 2001-2018
  • Nutrition
    • Pam Grimes, 1986-2018
  • Theory and Practice in Teacher Education
    • Richard Allington, 2005-2017
    • Pat Flynn, 1974-2018
    • Nivedita Ganguly, 2010-2018
    • Karen Walker, 1995-2017

  • Enjoy photos from this year’s event here.

    Kinesiology, Recreation & Sports Studies Awards Ceremony

    Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sports Studies Holds 2018 Awards Celebration

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences’ Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sports Studies held its 2018 Awards Celebration last week.

    Awards were presented to department members, American Kinesiology Association members, and to members of the Partners in Sports program.  Faculty, staff and students were also recognized for their receipt of Chancellor’s Awards, campus and college awards.


    College Awards

    Helen Watson Dissertation Award

    Allison Smith – PhD, Sport Management

    CEHHS Graduate Student Colloquium – Viewer’s Choice Poster Presentation

    Derrick Yates – MS Candidate, Exercise Physiology

    Joan Cronan Lady Vol Gradaute Fellowship

    Kelsi Schaer – MS Candidate, Sport Management


    Campus Awards

    Student/Faculty Research Award

    Kylee Ault – MS Candidate, Sport Psychology & Motor Behavior Jedediah Blanton, PhD– Faculty, Sport Psychology & Motor Behavior


    Undergraduate Classics Research Conference

    Emily R. Brower – Undergraduate, Kinesiology Representation of Human Musculature in the Bronze Age Aegean


    Chancellor’s Awards

    Hardy Liston, Jr. Symbol of Hope Award

    Steven Waller, PhD – Faculty, Recreation Management

    Chancellor’s Excellence in Teaching Award

    Lars Dzikus, PhD – Faculty, Socio-Cultural Studies

    Chancellor’s Graduate Student Teaching Award

    Andrew Bass – PhD Candidate, Sport Psychology & Motor Behavior

    Chancellor’s Top Collegiate Scholar Awards

    Elizabeth Lynn Elajam – Undergraduate, Kinesiology

    Chancellor’s Extraordinary Professional Promise

    Emily Corley

    Erin Hendricks

    Kelsi Schaer

    Jessican Siegele

    Lexi Hartsock


    Chancellor’s Scholar Athlete Awards

    Emily Allen

    Nicole Chojnacky

    Scott Cousino

    Jennifer Davis

    Kortney Dunbar

    Malik Elion

    Meghan Gregg

    Josephine Jenning

    Jakob Johnson

    Brianna Leverenz

    Riley Lovingood

    Anneliese Newell

    Kyle Phillips



    Partners in Sports Award Winners

    Buck Jones Award for Professional Promise

    Sidney Bunyan, Ryan Martineau

    Joy T. DeSensi Professionalism Award

    Erin Hendricks, Nathan Diambra

    Partners in Sports Service Award

    Ariel Williams

    Emilee Howard

    Macy Tilton


    Emile Catignani Award for Active Living

    Scott Cousino

    Partners in Sports Scholarship Awards

    Rachel Guia

    Josh Lively

    Kenny Miller

    Erin Holland

    Andrew Porth

    Caleb Wilson

    Sara Sturzo



    Regional Awards

    Midwest Sport and Exercise Psychology Symposium

    Outstanding Graduate Student Presentation

    Morgan Eckenrod, PhD Candidate

    Sport Psychology & Motor Behavior


    National Awards

    North American Society for the Sociology of Sport

    Gary Sailes Graduate Diversity Scholarship

    Alexander Deeb, PhD Candidate, Socio-Cultural Studies

     

    Enjoy photos from the event!

    csps camera

    Center for Sport, Peace and Society for the Sport for Community Action Plan Presentations

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Services’ Center for Sport, Peace, and Society will host live action plan presentations on April 24 and April 25 via Facebook.  This is part of their Sport for Community, #S4C2018, and will include all seventeen delegates from the 2018 U.S. Department of State Global Sports Mentoring Program.

    The U.S. Department of State Global Sports Mentoring Program is a global network of changemakers.  The program combines mentorship and cultural exchange to connect more than 130 changemakers on a mission to positively impact their societies.  These seventeen have came from all across the world; from Brazil to Cambodia to Paraguay.  The presentations today will include the plans they have developed with their mentors for inspiring sport-based social change.

    Be sure to watch as these leaders are preparing to change the world!

    Recipients in our college for the Chancellors Citation include:

    CEHHS Faculty, Staff and Students Recognized at Chancellor’s Honors Banquet

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences is proud of their faculty, staff and students.  Several were named as recipients at the 2018 Chancellor’s Honors banquet. Awards were presented in two categories, the Chancellor’s Citation Awards & Campus Honors.

    Recipients in our college for the Chancellors Citation include:

    Extraordinary Academic Achievement-Honors Undergraduates Who Exhibit Extraordinary Scholarship

    • Emily Kathryn Allen
    • Nicole Lynn Chojnacky
    • Natalie Renee Cross
    • Jennifer Lynn Davis
    • Kortney N. Dunbar
    • Malik Toure Elion
    • Sarah Meghan Gregg
    • Hannah Joy Holman
    • Josephine Jennings
    • Brianna Helen Leverenz
    • Riley James Lovingood
    • Anneliese Marie Newell
    • Kyle Lawrence Phillips
    • Marshall Shane Welch
    • Carlee Laine Workman

    Extraordinary Campus Leadership & Service-For graduating students who are extraordinary campus leaders with significant service to others.

    Sarah Nadel, Educational Psychology & Research PhD Program

    Extraordinary Professional Promise-Honors are awarded to undergraduate and graduate students who demonstrate professional promise in teaching, research and other contributions.

    • Emily Sue Corley
    • Isabel Cecilia Farrell
    • Katherine V. Graham
    • Lexi Jean Hartsock
    • Erin Greggory Hendricks
    • Colton (Tanner) Kilpatrick
    • Julia Grace Navin
    • Abigail G. Rider
    • Kelsi Anne Schaer
    • Jessica Laing Siegele

    Graduate Student Teaching Award-Honors graduate student excellence in instruction.

    Andrew Bass, KRSS

    Outstanding Scholar Athlete Awards-Honors students who excel exceptionally in both scholarship and athletics.

    • Emily Kathryn Allen
    • Nicole Lynn Chojnacky
    • Scott Cousino
    • Jennifer Lynn Davis
    • Kortney N. Dunbar
    • Malik Toure Elion
    • Sarah Meghan Gregg
    • Hannah Joy Holman
    • Josephine Jennings
    • Jakob Johnson
    • Brianna Helen Leverenz
    • Riley James Lovingood
    • Anneliese Marie Newell
    • Kyle Lawrence Phillips

    Top Collegiate Scholar Awards-Honors undergraduates who exhibit extraordinary scholarship.

    • Elizabeth Lynn Elajam
    • Olivia Brooke Herd
    • Amanda Ruth Tennille

    Recipients in our college for Campus Honors include:

    Excellence in Advising Award-Bestowed by the Office of the Chancellor and the Teaching Council of the Faculty Senate to honor outstanding work in advising.

    • Lucy Simpson, Academic Advisor and Internship Coordinator, RHTM
    • Jana Spitzer, Interim Director of Advising and Student Services

    Excellence in Teaching-Bestowed by the Office of the Chancellor and the Teaching Council of the Faculty Senate to honor outstanding work in the classroom.

    • Lars Dzikus, KRSS

    Hardy Liston Jr. Symbol of Hope Award-Honors a faculty member, staff member, or friend of the university who demonstrates a commitment to diversity and multiculturalism.

    • Steven Waller, KRSS

    Research and Creative Achievement-Given to senior faculty in recognition of excellence in research, scholarship and creative achievement.

    • Melinda Gibbons, EPC

    Torchbearer-The highest honor given to UT students, this distinction reminds all students that those who bear the Torch of Enlightenment shadow themselves to give light to others.  Given to honor graduating seniors for academic excellence and service to the university and society at large.

    • Feroza Freeland, Volunteer with University Assisted Community Schools
    • Morgan Hartgrove, Health Policy & Public Health

     

    A full listing of all the awards and recipients can be found on the Chancellor’s Honors Banquet website.

     

     

    Phi Kappa Phi Initiates

    Six Students Initiated into Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society

    Congratulations to the Spring Initiates of Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society

    • Emily Brooks
    • Sophie Lowe
    • Leslie Owle, graduate
    • Valerie Schmidt-Gardner
    • Skyla Smith
    • Shannon Wilson

    The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi is the oldest and most selective multidisciplinary collegiate honor society with more than 30,000 members across 300 campuses. Membership consists of top juniors, seniors, and graduate students who meet rigorous eligibility requirements including completed credit hours and ranking within the top 7.5-10% of their class.

    Conversations Worth Having Book Cover

    CEHHS Alumni Authors Book on Conversations

    A College of Education, Health and Human Sciences alumni, Cheri Torres, has co-authored a book, “Conversations Worth Having: Using Appreciative Inquiry to Fuel Productive and Meaningful Engagement.”  The book, co-authored with Jackie Stavros, uses real life stories to teach two simple practices for creating conversations worth having and five principles to support success.

    Cheri is a 2008 graduate of the Educational Psychology and Counseling Department where she was heavily influenced by the teachings of John Peters.  Originally, Cheri and Jackie began a journey to rewrite their first book, “Dynamic Relationships: Unleashing the Power of Appreciative Inquiry in Daily Living.”  Through this revision process, a realization of the evolution of their thinking process prompted them to write a new book instead.  “We see the potential to change people’s lives and community and organizational outcomes” said Cheri.  “Working closely with our editor, we believe we’ve created a book that will easily speak to people-people looking to have more uplifting conversations, strong relational connections and more innovative and creative outcomes for the complex problems facing our organizations and communities these days.  This is the first book we’ve written that is filled with practical “how to” combined with illustrative stories.”

    Author Homepage photo jackie and cheriCheri and Jackie’s two foundational practices can fuel productivity, creativity, positive energy and engagement as well as deepen personal relationships, empower family members to thrive and make us happier.

    More information on where to purchase Cheri and Jackie’s book can be found here.

     

     

    Patricia Bell-Scott, Commission for Blacks Trailblazer Award Recipient

    CFS Alumna to Receive African American Trailblazer Award

     

    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences is proud to share that Patricia Bell-Scott, Child and Family Studies alumna, will be presented the 4th African American Trailblazer Award of the 2017-18 year.

    Patricia was in the first cohort of students in the interdisciplinary doctoral program introduced in 1972 with Priscilla Blanton, professor emeriti in Child and Family Studies.  After, they team taught a course on African American families.  “Looking back, I realize how young we both were!” said Priscilla.  “I learned both personally and professionally in my role as Pat’s major professor and am very proud of her accomplishments.”  Patricia is now professor emerita of women’s studies and human development and family science at the University of Georgia

    More information about Patricia, her upcoming award, and the Commission on Blacks can be found on the Commission for Blacks website.

     

    Educators Hall of Honor

    UT’s Educators Hall of Honor Inducts Seven New Members and Awards Scholarship

    UT’s College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences recently inducted seven educators into the Educators Hall of Honor Class of 2018.

    The Hall of Honor was established to recognize educators who have made profound differences in their students’ lives and the community. The program also generates an endowed scholarship fund to assist students who are in the process of becoming teachers.

    The Class of 2018 includes:

    Susan Benner, PhD, the recently retired Associate Dean for Professional Licensure and Director of the Bailey Graduate School of Education in the College of Education, Health & Human Sciences and longtime state and local advocate for teacher licensure, special education, the arts, and child care.

    Read More…


    Robert J Booker, former director of the Beck Cultural Exchange Center, Knoxville Journal columnist, author of three (3) books, and served on the State and Civil Service Commission and the Tennessee Committee on Humanities.

    Read More…


    Susan Dillard, PhD, a retired and revered retail and consumer science professor, co-chair of the Davis Center for Child Development Board of Advisors as well as an active Emeritus member of the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences Board of Advisors.

    Read More…


     

    Polly Anna Harris, a retired Bearden High School math and calculus teacher.  After twenty-three years of service, a wing of Bearden High School was named in her honor.

    Read More…

     


     

    Wanda Lacy, a current Farragut High School math and AP Calculus teacher and Mathematics Department Chair who has been honored with accolades such as Teacher of the Year at Farragut, two-time Teacher of the Year for Knox County Schools, East Tennessee Teacher of the Year, and State of Tennessee Teacher of the Year award to name a few.

    Read More…


     

    Dulcie Peccolo, PhD, retired director of Office of Advising and Student Services within the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences, and former assistant director of the University of Tennessee Evening School.

    Read More…


     

    Wayne Tipps, PhD, a proud retiree of the Univeristy of Tennessee where he served as a professor of Music Education and active in the Tennessee Bandmasters Association including roles as president, vice president, convention chair, and executive secretary.  He also served as the conductor of the East Tennessee Concert Band.

    Read More…


    Cassie Kay Norvell, PhD, student in Reading Education and Literacy Studies, was awarded the 2018 Educators Hall of Honor Scholarship.  Cassie will complete her PhD in May, 2018.

    Read More…


    The Educators Hall of Honor was founded in 2002 by C. Glennon Rowell, the late dean of the former College of Education, as a way to recognize deserving educators and assist future teachers.

    “These honorees are the consummate teachers, mentors, leaders, advocates, and scholars,” said Sherry Bell, acting dean of the College.  “Their dedication and service have profoundly and positively shaped education and impacted countless lives.”

    Bob Kesling, direct of broadcasting for UT athletics and the play-by-play voice of football and basketball games, emceed the event, which was held April 5th at the Knoxville Hilton.

     

    Photos from the event can be viewed here.

    Student sitting at computer doing research

    CEHHS Faculty Receive 2018 Research Seed Funding

    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences congratulates four faculty members in our college as their projects were chosen as recipients of the Office of Research and Engagement 2018 Research Seed funding.

    Faculty in the departments of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education, Child and Family Studies, and Nutrition were chosen as three of the twenty-three projects from the faculty of UT Knoxville and the UT Space Institute.  The funding program was launched in October, 2017 and serves as a catalyst to help generate proposal submissions to specific sponsors or around a particular initiative.

    Recipients are:

    Community Engaged Research Seed Program

    • Lynn Hodge, associate professor of mathematics education, for her project, “Mathematizing, Visualizing, and Power: Students Creating Statistical Literacies through Popular Representations”

    Community Engaged Research Seed Program

    • Megan Haselschwerdt, assistant professor of Child and Family Studies and director of the Family Violence Across the Lifespan Research Team, for her project, “Family Studies Assessing Intimate Partner Violence Victims’ Help-Seeking Needs and Experiences”

    NIH Preliminary Results Research Seed Program

    • Julia Jaekel, associate professor of Child and Family Studies and co-director of the Early Experiences Research Center, for her project, “Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) Follow-Up Study”

    NIH Preliminary Results Research Seed Program

    • Dallas Donohoe, assistant professor of Nutrition as a co-principal investigator with Jeremiah Johnson, assistant professor of microbiology, for their project, “Mechanism of Campylobacter persistence of young children in low-resource settings and its impact on gastrointestinal health and metabolism”

    This is the first year ORE has awarded internal funding through the Research Seed Program. Grant recipients were selected by evaluation panels comprised of UT faculty and external program officers (if appropriate) related to each category.  The panels then scored and recommended proposals for funding.

     

    public health video clip

    Public Health Student Video Wins State Challenge

     
    Students in the Department of Public Health are challenged each Spring to develop a short video used to educate the public on a health topic important to today’s society. Their entries are then submitted to the Tennessee Public Health Association’s (TPHA) Annual Student Video Challenge. Previous year’s participants have been winners and the great work continues!

    Check out these awesome videos submitted to the challenge. One was the 2018 TPHA Award Winner!

    Jedediah Blanton, KRSS

    Pressure on Young Athletes: Six Questions with Jedediah Blanton

    Tips for Young Athletes

    Jedediah Blanton, assistant professor in Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sports Studies in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences is featured in the UT News discussing kids involvement in sports.  With Spring comes baseball and families participating in other forms of athletics, the beginning of the peak season.

    Jedediah shares his advice in this article for student-athletes, coaches and parents in which he focuses on maximizing the benefits of youth sport and minimizing the detriments by answering six key questions.

     

    photo of undergraduate students

    Become a Dean’s Undergraduate Advisory Board Ambassador

     
    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences offers you the opportunity to become a part of making our next undergraduate students’ experience a great one!  With the organization of the Dean’s Undergraduate Advisory Board, two students from each department are selected and serve as ambassadors to represent their college at recruitment events throughout the academic year.

    Students selected to serve on the advisory board will have the opportunity to meet Dean Rider once a semester to provide feedback on the undergraduate experience in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences.

    So don’t hesitate! Complete this application and deliver it to Jada Russell, Coordinator of Recruitment and Retention in our Office of Advising and Student Services located in A332, Bailey Education Complex.

    Dorian McCoy

    Dorian McCoy Selected for 2018-2019 Leadership Program

    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences congratulates Dorian McCoy, selected for the 2018-19 Leadership Program conducted by the Office of the Provost.  Over the course of the next year, Dorian will work with the Office of the Provost in an intensive program to develop leadership skills with a cohort of other leaders from within the university.

    Dorian is an Associate Professor of Higher Education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, and also serves as the coordinator for the College Student Personnel Program.  During the summers, Dorian co-directs the UTK-Project Grad (Graduation Really Achieves Dreams) Summer Institute; an pre-college collaboration between Project Grad, Knoxville and UTK which provides an opportunity for high school students to participate and gain experience in an academic setting.

    torchbearer in the snow

    CEHHS Graduate Students Receive Fellowships

     
    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences (CEHHS) congratulates our recipients of graduate fellowships for the 2018-19 academic year.  Applicants for these fellowships are nominated by their departments.  These fellowships are divided as either new or returning students and are evaluated accordingly.  The fellowships are established to promote opportunities for students to demonstrate successful academic and professional performance, excelled in undergraduate work and shown professional potential.

    These are the CEHHS recipients and their program of study:

    Seaton Graduate School Fellowship
    Chelsi Webster, MS-Nutrition
    Tanner Kilpatrick, PhD-Child and Family Studies

    Isobel Griscom Graduate School Fellowship
    Kelly Mullican, PhD-Child and Family Studies

    Access and Diversity Fellowships
    Ana Maria Melendez Guevara, PhD-Child and Family Studies

    J. Wallace & Katie Dean Graduate Fellowship
    Elizabeth Hall, PhD-Nutritional Sciences
    Kristin Fowler, PhD-School Psychology, Educational Psychology & Counseling
    Amanda Rigell, PhD-Education
    Yang Yang, PhD-Nutritional Sciences

     

    Dr. Sarah and Dr. Malnati at WITW

    CSPS Meets U.S. Olympic Hockey Team, Speaks at SXSW Festival

    Over the past month, directors from the Center for Sport, Peace, and Society (CSPS) traveled throughout the United States celebrating the powerful impact of sport in the lives of women at several significant events, including the 2018 South by Southwest Festival, the Los Angeles Women in the World Salon, and the USA Gold Medal Women’s Hockey Tour.

    Logging thousands of travel miles, the CSPS continues to receive national and international invitations as it establishes itself as the preeminent center for sport and women’s empowerment in the United States.

    Dr. Sarah with Tina Brown WITWIn February, Dr. Sarah Hillyer, director of the center, was on the red carpet as an official representative interviewing the incredible women engaged in the LA Women in the World salon. Founded by media mogul Tina Brown in 2010, Women in the World annually brings together the world’s most powerful women for national events where they discuss relevant gender issues. At the L.A. event, more than 200 audience members were present to hear from speakers such as Academy Award winner Viola Davis, heroic British-Syrian doctor Rola Hallam, and Marinus Analytics CEO Emily Kennedy, among others.

    Dr. Sarah Hillyer interviews Felicity Huffman

    At our #WITW L.A. Salon, Dr. Sarah Hillyer of The Center for Sport, Peace, & Society caught up with Felicity Huffman on the red carpet and they talked about Toyota USA's #StartYourImpossible global campaign.

    Posted by Women in the World on Monday, March 19, 2018

    Hillyer spoke with Brown, Hallam and many other powerful female leaders at the event about several key issues: the influence of women athletes as role models, the importance of physical, social, and economic mobility as promoted by Toyota’s Start Your Impossible campaign, and the importance of physical activity and sports in the lives of girls and women.

    “The Women in the World Salon is a place for the most powerful women of our time to engage in topics that matter most. Being a part of the conversation in 2018 is timely and essential. Women’s voices have never been louder. We see the Center as a place where solutions can take shape and women can find support to tackle the issues so prevalent in today’s world.”

    Dr. Sarah USA HockeyMore invitations followed in March when Hillyer participated in activities with the U.S. Olympic Women’s Ice Hockey Team, fresh off its gold-medal victory at the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics. Organized in cooperation with long-time Global Sports Mentoring Program mentor Susan Cohig of the National Hockey League (NHL) and the U.S. Department of State, Hillyer was a part of the team’s official welcome at the NHL and other events at the U.S. State Department and She Believes Cup.

    As part of her time with the team, Hillyer was joined by GSMP alumna Olga Dolinina, a Ukrainian woman who launched national table hockey events serving hundreds of children and adults with PTSD from military conflict along Ukraine’s eastern border. Dolinina developed the project with the support of Cohig and Hillyer as a 2015 GSMP participant.

    Dr. Sarah speaking at SXSWAfter her time with the team, Hillyer traveled with assistant director Dr. Ashleigh Huffman to Austin, Texas for the South by Southwest (SXSW) festival. On March 11, the CSPS directors participated in a panel, “The Power of the Global Sports Mentoring Program,” moderated by ESPN’s Cari Champion, alongside Matt McMahon, division chief for the U.S. Department of State’s Sports Diplomacy Division, Laura Dixon, head of external relations for Spurs Sports and Entertainment, and Carla Bustamante, a 2015 alumna of the program who has spent her time since the program promoting women’s sports campaigns and softball clinics through her work as public relations director of Naranjeros Baseball Club.

    The CSPS has been the implementing partner for the GSMP since 2012, only months after Hillyer and Huffman established the center in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences. Hillyer and Huffman’s team has supported 113 alumni from 63 countries in its Empower Women through Sports and Sport for Community exchanges. Among the many statistics tracked by the CSPS since 2012, alumni have engaged more than 190,000 youth in sport and life-skills clinics, involved more than 5,300 volunteers, formed 448 new partnerships with NGOs, businesses, and government, and implemented their Action Plans at an 88 percent success rate.

    “It has been an amazing whirlwind of activity in the last three months. It can be easy to feel discouraged in the world in which we live, but at the Center, we see progress. We see lives changing. We see people making a difference. We see human beings reaching across ethnic, religious, cultural, and political divides to create a more peaceful and inclusive world. And we see sport as a the unifying force of it all.”

    The center will lead its next program on March 23, when it receives a delegation of 17 international sports leaders for the 2018 GSMP: Sport for Community program. Follow along with the CSPS on its social media pages: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

    Story contributed by: Brian Canever, Digital Media Coordinator, CSPS

    Spread the Word to End the Word Group

    Spread the Word to End the Word Day

    Written by Lexie Vaughn, Vice-President of Best Buddies and a junior majoring in special education in the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

    Spread the Word to End the Word is a movement to end the r-word, retarded. We ask people to not use the r-Word because it’s disrespectful, derogatory, and dehumanizing. When people use the r-word, they usually are meaning stupid or dumb, but people with disabilities are not stupid or dumb. There are so many better words that they could use to better describe what they are feeling without disrespecting or hurting a persons feelings. Spread the Word to End the Word

    We, Best Buddies, partnered with Pi Kappa Phi and Student Council for Exceptional Children to create the Spread the Word Day on campus. We also had three high schools join us. We asked people to sign the pledge against the r-Word and by the end, filled up two posters! We also passed out donuts donated by Dippin’ Donuts, because Vols “donut” say the r-word. It was a really powerful day on campus and a movement we were really proud to be apart of. To end the day, we were featured on WATE news. It was really great to not only reach to UTK campus, but also to the East Tennessee community.

    Spread the Word to End the Word Day was celebrated on Wednesday, March 7, 2018 on the pedestrian walkway by students with UTK Best Buddies and others impacted from around the community who joined in sharing the message including students from the college’s own FUTURE program. 

    2018 Graduate Student Research Colloquium

    2018 Graduate Student Research Colloquium

    The 2018 Graduate Student Research Colloquium in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences was held on Friday, March 2.  Graduate students from within the college had the opportunity to present their research in a conference setting.   Students then received feedback from faculty and other graduate students in attendance and had an opportunity to practice their presentation skills.

    The event was hosted by the Dean’s Graduate Student Advisory Board of the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences. More information about the event can be found here.

    Enjoy a few photos from the 2018 Graduate Student Research Colloquium.

    Awards were presented to the following:

    Rebecca Layton, Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher EducationDeveloping Pre-Service Teachers’ Knowledge about Problem-Based Learning through Task Comparisons

    Sewon Min, Department of Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism ManagementThe Glass Ceiling: How it is Perceived and How it Affects Work Engagement Among Hotel Employees

    Deborah Kirkland, Department of Public HealthA Systematic Review of Interventions that Increase Earlier Uptake of the HPV Vaccine in Girls 9 to 17-years-old in the United States

    Mohammed Alquraishi, Department of NutritionRole of PKM2 in LPS-induced Renal Injury

    Lindsay Toth, Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies – Video-Recorded Validation of Wearable Step Counters Under Free-living Conditions

    Nathan West, Department of Educational Psychology and CounselingDevelopmental Networks and Interpersonal Support of Beginning Counselors

    Benjamin Nam, Department of Educational Leadership and Policy StudiesConflicts Among Stakeholders Regarding the New Academic Policy in the Korea University Sport Federation

    Ashlyn Schwartz, Department of Child and Family StudiesEmotional and Behavioral Adjustment

    Lindsay Toth –  Video-Recorded Validation of Wearable Step Counters Under Free-living Conditions (Oral)

    Lauren SchroederA Raised Surface Affects Ankle Biomechanics During a Common Softball Task (Poster Session I)

    Derrick Yates Preference for and Tolerance of Exercise Intensity in Group Indoor Cycling (Poster Session II)

    Adeline Grier-WelchPerceptions of Food Pantry Usage and Food Acquisition Behaviors Among Food Pantry Users in East Tennessee (Poster Session I)

    Emily Hager Exploring the Environmental Link to Obesity-Associated Breast Cancer: The Story of Parabens (Poster Session II

    Kayley DavisWait, College Students Have Motivations Against Sex? (Poster Session I)

    Kaylee CouvillionAttentional Focus Effects on the Performance of a Continuous Whole-Body Task with Object Manipulation (Poster Session II)

    Lauran GieskeTV Consumption Mediates Effects of Family Adversity on Immigrant Children’s Executive Functions (EF) (Poster Session I)

    Lucia Miranda – Impact of Early Biological Versus Environmental Adversity on Temperament at 6 Years: A Comparison of the English and Romanian Adoptee Study and Bavarian Longitudinal Study (Poster Session II)


     

     

     

    American College of Sports Medine

    Exercise is Medicine-On Campus Program

    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences congratulates Eugene Fitzhugh of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies.  Fitzhugh, working with Becky Morgan and Spencer Gregg of the Student Health Center and Theresa Ezell of RecSports are working to implement an Exercise is Medicine-On Campus Program. The program recently received a “gold medal” rating from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).

    American College of Sports Medicine LogoIn this initiative, physicians at the UT Student Health Center assess students’ levels of activity using a 2-item questionnaire called the “Physical Activity Vital Sign”.  This is routinely done at office visits, and the data are entered into the medical record system.  Students who do not meet the 150-minutes-per-week exercise goal will be referred to the Center for Physical Activity and Health, where they will receive physical activity counseling from Kinesiology students who are trained to give them ideas and resources to get moving.

    Image Copyright: American College of Sports Medicine ©

    Sally Brink

    RHTM Senior Sally Brink Goes Backstage at New York Fashion Week

    Sally Brink, a senior in the Retail and Consumer Sciences program in the Department of Retail, Hospitality and Tourism Management (RHTM) loves fashion! And her love of fashion took her to Fashion Week in New York!  RHTM, located within the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences, offers programs in the retail, hospitality and tourism field that are nationally and internationally recognized for preparing professionals in the industry.

    Sally was one of a select group of students chosen for this opportunity offered by IMG College Licensing and due to her internship in UT’s Office of Trademark Licensing.  The experience, networking and connections Brink made will assist her as she takes a position as an assistant buyer with Belk upon graduation.  Brink shared the highlights of her trip with UT News which takes us on her incredible journey during the 2018 New York Fashion Week.

    A Weekend on Rocky Top: College Student Personnel Style

    Written by Madison Merrifield, CEHHS Student Marketing Ambassador and graduate student in the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies’ College Student Personnel program.

    On February 15-17, 29 future students from across the country visited Rocky Top to learn more about the College Student Personnel (CSP) program. But this wasn’t any ordinary visit for these students–this visit was planned majorly by current CSP students! One of these awesome planners was Tom Scearce, a first-year student in the program. “I was involved in this process since September, so I got to see the event from start to finish,” he shared. From contacting campus partners to organizing meals with local businesses to crafting a smoothly-running schedule, the work Tom did for this event was a great skills-building experience for him.

    “I absolutely enjoyed coming to CSP Interview Weekend last year, so having the opportunity to plan it this year and help the incoming students go through this process was so rewarding.”

     

     

    But Tom wasn’t alone in the planning; almost every current student was involved in the event! Most future students were able to stay with current students for the duration of their visit. On Thursday evening, both current CSP cohorts ate with future students and a large group was even able to explore Market Square that night. All weekend, future students commented on how welcome they felt by the CSP program. Tom agreed, mentioning the group did “a very good job of showing what it is really like to be a CSP student at Tennessee.”

    Overall, the CSP Interview Weekend was a big success for both future and current students. Current students were able to tangibly and intentionally invest in the direction of the program and future students were able to see all that Big Orange Country has to offer. It was a reminder that this university is truly a family and, for Tom, of “how fortunate I am to be a part of the Volunteer community. I love UT CSP!”

     

    students at south knox with deans staff advsiory board donations

    Dean’s Staff Advisory Board Makes Donation to Adopted School

    The Dean’s Staff Advisory Board (DSAB) in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences is all about the kids! Once group of kids got to feel the love; the kids at South Knox Elementary, their adopted school. With the encouragement of the dean, Bob Rider, whose heart has always truly belonged to the kids, the advisory board was formed to encourage outreach and interaction with the children in the community upon which our daily jobs make a final impact.  Working in the college, employees make the difference day to day in the preparation of teachers going into schools like South Knox Elementary.  Students are loved at the college level and they thoroughly enjoy the opportunity to connect with the children that their students go on to teach and mentor.

    Donations were collected from staff throughout the college over the last month for the children specifically but also for the teachers.  Low budgets leave classroom needs often unmet and the DSAB hopes that their small efforts make a difference.  The looks on the children’s faces as they receive the donations seem to say they do!

    KatiePotter, Graduate from CEHHS Teacher Preparation Program

    UT Ranked as Top Institution for Teacher Preparation

    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences at UT received the highest possible rating for teacher preparation in the state, according to the newly released 2017 Teacher Preparation Report Card.

    UT, the only tier-four public university and one of seven tier-four programs in the state, has recommended more than 1,000 graduates for teacher licensure in the past five years and more than 3,800 in the past 16 years.

    “This accomplishment comes from our outstanding faculty, staff, supervisors, school partners, and mentoring teachers who collectively enhance educational expectations across the Bailey Graduate School of Education,” said David Cihak, interim associate dean of UT’s College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences and director of the school. “Our exceptional students and graduates perpetuate these expectations to ensure the highest academic outcomes and experiences for the students they teach.”

    UT improved in all report card categories. Additional highlights include:

    • More candidates are seeking high-demand endorsements to meet state and local school teacher needs, including English as a Second Language, secondary science, special education, world languages, and secondary math.
    • First-year employment rates in public schools increased to 77.6 percent, and, of those, 95.9 percent were retained and teaching in Tennessee the following year.
    • Teacher graduates are making an impact with 96.5 percent of teachers rated as level 3 (at expectations) or above and an increase in teachers rated as level 4 or 5 (“above” or “significantly above”) on the 1–5 teacher effectiveness observation scale. Tennessee Value-Added Assessment System teacher effectiveness ratings/scores also improved with 65.7 percent of teachers receiving a level 3 or above and an increase in teachers who received a 4 or 5 level of effectiveness.

    UT also sends out a survey to recent graduates every year and principals every other year. According to UT’s 2017 survey, 97 percent of principals indicated they are satisfied or very satisfied with UT’s teacher preparation program and would feel comfortable hiring future graduates. Likewise, 92 percent of graduates are confident and satisfied with the program, rating their preparation as good to excellent.

    “Our program is committed to graduate highly effective teachers who enhance, invigorate, and regenerate the Tennessee educational landscape,” said Cihak.

    UT’s Bailey Graduate School of Education offers five-year programs of study leading to teacher licensure in elementary education, middle grades mathematics and science, secondary English, secondary social sciences, world languages, art education, English as a second language, and special education; undergraduate teacher licensure programs in STEM fields and early childhood education; and collaborative programs in music education, agricultural education, and information and media specialization.

    All of the college’s professional licensure programs are approved by the Tennessee State Department of Education and nationally accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Educator Preparation.

    Check out the story also featured on UT News!

    CONTACT:

    Bonnie Maples (865-974-3499, bmaples@utk.edu)

    Tyra Haag (865-974-5460, tyra.haag@tennessee.edu)

     

    Brittany-Anderson

    Theory & Practice in Teacher Education Receives Multiple Awards

     
    The Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences is celebrating several awards presented to faculty and doctoral students.

    Brittany Anderson, Assistant Professor in Urban-Multicultural Education, was presented the Carolyn Callahan Doctoral Student Award at the 64th NAGC Annual Convention in November, 2017.  Anderson was selected for this award because of her scholarship and work in the field of gifted education.  She completed her doctoral studies at the University of Georgia, May, 2017.narst logo-Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning Through Research

    Amelia Adams Brown, doctoral student, has been awarded the 2018 Jhumki Basu Scholar Award from the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST).  Amelia is currently a Graduate Research Assistant in the Office of Professional Licensure and will complete her doctoral studies this Spring.

    STaR-service teaching and research in mathematics education logoFrances Harper, Assistant Professor in STEM Education, has been accepted into the STaR Program for early career math educators by the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE).  The induction program for early career mathematics eductors working at institutions of higher education was initiated through a grant from the National Science Foundation and serves as a mentoring program for it’s members.

     

     

     

    Jimmy Cheek, UTK Chancellor Emeritus

    Chancellor Emeritus and Distinguished Professor, Jimmy Cheek, Named 2018 United Way Campaign Chair

     
    Jimmy Cheek, Chancellor Emeritus and Distinguished Professor, will be taking on another new role for the year; the 2018 United Way Campaign Chair in addition to his role within our college. He will replace Ken Lowe, who over the course of 2017, raised almost fourteen million dollars for the organization. The United Way helps people by raising funds and supporting programs that provide opportunity and create lasting change in the community.  His efforts will help ensure a good life for all by funding essential programs.

    In Fall 2017, Cheek joined the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences (CEHHS) in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. In addition to teaching graduate classes, Cheek has established and oversees the Postsecondary Education Research Center (PERC). This center identifies, conducts and coordinates research on initiatives and ideas designed to enhance higher education at the institutional, state, and national levels to enhance policy and practice. Through this center, partnerships with organizations such as the Tennessee Board of Regents and the university system as well as several postsecondary institutions across the state will focus on improving higher education in Tennessee.

    CEHHS congratulates you on this new appointment and wishes you every success.

    Huffman and basketball players from Minas Gerais pose for a group photo after a clinic

    UT Professor Travels to Brazil as Basketball Envoy

    For Ashleigh Huffman, assistant director of UT’s Center for Sport, Peace, and Society, every day on the job is spent, in some way, traveling around the world.

    Since 2012, the center has served as the cooperative agreement partner on the US Department of State’s Global Sports Mentoring Program (GSMP), an initiative that has welcomed 130 leaders from 67 countries to the US for five-week exchange programs. Huffman and her team take a hands-on approach to these exchanges, which focus on the themes of women’s empowerment and disability inclusion, and maintain relationships with the international participants long after the programs end.

    Ashleigh Huffman in BrazilOn this occasion, however, Huffman wasn’t welcoming new leaders to the US. Instead, she received an invitation from the State Department to spend a week leading clinics and workshops in Brazil.

    “It was an honor to serve the US Department of State as a sports envoy to Brazil,” Huffman said after returning home. “This was my fifth time in the country, and honestly, it has become a second home.”

    Like the GSMP, the envoy program is run out of the State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Envoys are former college athletes, professional athletes, and coaches who are sent overseas to lead clinics and workshops for youth. Huffman, who played college basketball at Eastern Kentucky University, traveled to Brazil alongside fellow sports envoys Jeremy Guthrie, a former Major League Baseball pitcher, and Lorrie Fair, a member of the US Women’s National Soccer Team that won the 1999 Women’s World Cup and earned a silver medal at the 2000 Olympics.

    In Brazil, Huffman led basketball clinics for hundreds of boys and girls. She also spoke at a women’s empowerment event, organized by the US Consulate in São Paulo, with more than 150 individuals in attendance. Many of the clinics were organized to support participants in the Estrelas (Shooting Stars) program, a collaboration between the consulate and the Social Service of Commerce. The program combines sports, English language instruction, and leadership training for public school students between the ages of 13 and 15 in underprivileged neighborhoods of the city.

    Ashleigh Huffman in Brazil with athletesIn 2014, members of the Estrelas program traveled to Knoxville on a government exchange program. A year later Huffman and the center reconnected with them in São Paulo on a trip to support the work of four GSMP alumnae pushing for gender equality in the Brazilian sports system.

    “The youth we worked with were so eager to learn, hanging on every instruction and asking for continuous evaluation and feedback on the basketball court and in the classroom,” Huffman said. “I consider it a tremendous privilege to learn from them and with them, to listen to their dreams, and to share my passion for sport and education. If I can be their proof that dreams can become reality, then I am humbled to serve in that role.”

    At the university, Huffman serves as lead faculty for the VOLeaders Academy, a leadership development program for student-athletes formed in partnership with UT’s Athletics Department and the Center for Leadership and Service. In July, she will lead program participants on a study abroad trip to Ecuador, where they will offer sports projects for people with disabilities in rural communities affected by the country’s major 2016 earthquake.


    Story compliments of: CSPS in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences and is also featured in Tennessee Today.

     

     

     

    blue blood moon event

    Super Blue Blood Moon To Occur on January 31; First Time in 150 Years

    Last August, the moon treated East Tennessee to a spectacular total solar eclipse and spurred a new generation of stargazers across the country.  As if the solar eclipse wasn’t special enough, our moon is back for an encore performance of another rare event this week.  During the early morning hours of Wednesday, January 31, our moon will delight skywatchers with a rare supermoon/blue moon/lunar eclipse – also known as a Super Blue Blood Moon.

    What exactly is a Super Blue Blood Moon? 

    Let’s break it down to make sense of this amazing phenomenon.

    • First, a supermoon is a full (or new) moon that occurs when the moon is at its closest proximity in orbit to earth. According to NASA, the moon will be a mere 222,068 miles from earth on Wednesday.  As a result, the moon appears about 14 times larger and 30 percent brighter than a regular full moon (see image to the right – supermoon on left, regular full moon on right).blue blood moon
    • Next, a blue moon is when two full moons occur in the same calendar month. The last full moon happened in the United States on January 1.
    • Finally, a lunar eclipse is when the moon travels through the earth’s shadow. During a lunar eclipse, the moon is often referred to a blood moon because of the crimson color that appears due to sunlight being filtered through the earth’s atmosphere as it attempts to reach the moon.

    Unlike the August solar eclipse when the moon passed between the earth and the sun, this time the moon will pass on the backside of the earth where the earth casts a shadow blocking the sun’s light from reaching the moon’s surface (see diagram below).  As we learned in August, a total solar eclipse is only visible if you are located in the path of the moon’s shadow.  However, during a lunar eclipse, all areas located in the nighttime side of the earth will be privy to this lunar eclipse.

    How rare is this event?

    Again, let’s break down each lunar event to get a better understanding of the rarity of the moon’s upcoming night show.

    • A supermoon is the least rare of the three lunar events. Of the 12 to 13 full moons during a calendar year, about three of those are considered supermoons.
    • According to the NASA website, a lunar eclipse is fairly common too. At any particular location on Earth, a lunar eclipse can occur up to three times per year while other locations may not have one.
    • Have you ever heard the saying, “once in a blue moon?” That’s because blue moons are much more rare occurring about every 2.7 years.  This year is particularly special because there are two blue moons in one year (both January and March have two full moons).  This phenomenon is referred to as a double blue moon and only occurs three to five times per century.  The next double blue moon is in 2037.

    In the end, the big question is how rare is the coinciding of all three of these lunar events?  Well, skywatchers, set your alarms because you don’t want to miss this one.  The last time that all three events occurred simultaneously was 150 years ago.  In other words, no living human has witnessed this lunar phenomenon!

    When, where, and how do you witness this lunar event?

    While Alaska, Hawaii, and western North America will most certainly have the best vantage point for viewing a total lunar eclipse, our area will experience a partial lunar eclipse.  Along the East Coast, the lunar eclipse will begin at 5:51am when the moon enters the outer part of the earth’s shadow.  The best viewing opportunity will occur around 6:48am when the darkest part of the earth’s shadow blankets the moon creating a blood-red tint.

    Before you load the kids on the bus for school or head off to work yourself, I suggest finding a high place that provides a direct line of sight to the west-northwest horizon opposite of where the sunrises.  The event will be short lived as the sun rises shortly thereafter, but it lasts long enough to log another astronomical event into your memory book.  And, the best news….no glasses needed to view this eclipse!  A lunar eclipse is completely safe to view with the naked eye.

    If you wish to incorporate technology into your experience, I would recommend one of the following mobile apps: SkySafari 6 ($0.99), Star Walk 2 ($2.99), or Stellarium Mobile ($2.99).

    Happy lunar eclipsing, East Tennessee!


    Elizabeth MacTavishSpecial thanks to Elizabeth MacTavish for explaining this phenomenal event!  Elizabeth is a Clinical Assistant Professor in Science Education in the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education.  Prior, MacTavish taught in the Knox County school system for twelve years before completing her PhD in 2017 and beginning her position at the University of Tennessee.

     

    New Appointments & Promotions in CEHHS

    Appointments and Promotions

     
    January has been a busy month in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences.  Several appointments have been made for acting, interim and well-deserved permanent positions in our college.

    Just in case you might have missed that opportunity to congratulate your colleague, peers or friends, here they are all in one place for you.

    Sherry Bell was appointed Acting Dean while Dean Bob Rider is out for medical leave.

    Jeff Fairbrother Appointed Associate Dean of Academic and Faculty Affairs.

    David Cihak has been named Interim Associate Dean of Professional Licensure and Director of the David T. Bailey Graduate School of Education.

    David R. Bassett, Jr. has been named Department Head of Kinesiology, Recreation and Sport Studies.

    Mary Jane Moran has been named Department Head of Child and Family Studies.

    Everyone share in helping us congratulate everyone in these new positions.

    black lives matter

    Black Minds Matter

     
    On January 24, the Theory and Practice in Teacher Education (TPTE) Diversity Collaborative in Education (DCEd) hosted a Black Minds Matter event in Hodges Auditorium.  They showed “Policing and Schooling Black Boys and Men,” a video from the Black Minds Matter series, followed by an audience discussion. In the video, Luke Wood, Dean’s Distinguished Professor of Education at San Diego State University, presented statistics highlighting racial disparities related to policing and schooling, discussed the effects of these disparities, and concluded with recommendations for community members. Chonicka Coleman-King, Assistant Professor in TPTE’s Urban-Multicultural program, and Ashlee Anderson, in TPTE’s Cultural Studies program, served as facilitators.

    Following the video segment, audience members asked questions about teacher preparation, noted changes in student demographics, discussed disparities in district resources, and considered the role of the teacher and the community in working toward equity for students of color. This event is only the first in a series of Black Minds Matter events DCEd intends to host this spring. Future segments will engage with topics related to ascriptions of intelligence, assumptions of criminality, and promising teaching practices.

    Mary Jane Moran, Department Head of Child and Family Studies

    Moran Named Department Head for Child and Family Studies

     
    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences (CEHHS) is pleased to announce that Mary Jane Moran has accepted appointment to the position of Department Head for Child and Family Studies. Moran had been serving as interim prior to this appointment.

    Moran completed her BS in Special Education-Speech and Hearing in 1975. She then obtained her Masters in Child and Family Studies in 1976.  She earned her PHD at the University of New Hampshire where she was on the faculty and served as the director of the university Child Study and Development Center. In 2001 Moran returned to the university when she accepted a position as an assistant professor, then associate, reaching full professor in 2017. During this time, Moran has received  recognition for her outreach and engagement within the community, and her teaching and research in early childhood teacher education with an emphasis on teacher collaborative inquiry. She is an appointed member of the Tennessee Association for the Education of Young Children’s’ State Board and co-editor of a recently published book, Collaborative Cross-Cultural Research Methodologies in Early Care and Education Contexts. 

    Please join CEHHS in congratulating and welcoming Moran as the new Department Head of Child and Family Studies.

    David Bassett Jr Named New KRSS Department Head

    Bassett Named As Department Head for Kinesiology, Recreation and Sport Studies

     
    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences (CEHHS) is pleased to announce that David R. Bassett, Jr. has been appointed as Department Head of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies. He has served as the interim department head since May, 2016.

    Bassett is a professor whose research focuses on the measurement of physical activity and energy expenditure in humans, using objective methods.  He received a bachelor’s degree in Biology from Oberlin College, a master’s degree in Exercise Physiology from Ball State University, and a PhD in Physical Education from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.  He has been with the college since 1988 where he started as an assistant professor in Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies and as Co-Director of the Center of Physical Activity and Health.  He was appointed director of the Applied Physiology Laboratory in 1994, and he became a full professor in 2001.

    Bassett has served on the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Board of Trustees and the Science advisory board for the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition.  He is chair of the ACSM’s ActivEarth task force that promotes the benefits of active travel for health, the environment, and the economy. Bassett was also a board member of the International Society for the Measurement of Physical Behaviour for which he served as secretary.  He serves on the editorial board of two journals (Journal of Physical Activity and Health and Journal for the Measurement of Physical Behaviors).

    Please join CEHHS in congratulating and welcoming Dr. Bassett as the new Department Head of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies.

    Sherry Bell, Acting Dean

    Sherry Bell Appointed Acting Dean

    John Zomchick, Interim Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor has appointed Sherry Bell as acting dean for the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences.  Bell assumed this role effective immediately in the absence of Dean Bob Rider who is currently on medical leave.

    Bell, current Department Head of the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education, will lead operations for the college, the Bailey Graduate School of Education, and all centers, institutes and academics associated with the college.

    Read the official announcement from Zomchick as shared by the university.

    Melanie Slappey, 1st TPTE DHH program intern accepted at California School fo rthe Deaf in Fremont

    TPTE Intern First UTK Student to Intern at Premier ASL-English Bilingual School for the Deaf

    The Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing program in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences is taking students places they’ve never gone before!

    Melanie (Mel) SlappeyThis year, Melanie (Mel) Slappey, is completing the internship year as required through the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education in a kindergarten classroom at the Atlanta Area School for the Deaf.  But that’s not the only place Mel will complete the required internship.  During the fall, Mel engaged in a competitive interview process for the California School for the Deaf in Fremont, one of the nation’s premier ASL-English bilingual schools for deaf students and was accepted.  Mel will start the internship in March.

    David Cihak

    Cihak Named Interim Associate Dean of Professional Licensure and Director of the David T. Bailey Graduate School of Education

    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences (CEHHS) is pleased to announce the appointment of David Cihak, Professor of Special Education, as Interim Associate Dean of Professional Licensure and Director of the David T. Bailey Graduate School of Education.  Cihak is appointed to the position upon the retirement of Susan Benner in December.

    Cihak brings twenty years of experience in the area of special education as both a teacher and a teacher trainer.  He received his PhD from Georgia State University and has worked in our college since 2005, achieving the rank of professor in 2016 in the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education (TPTE).  During his time here, he has served as associate department head and director of undergraduate programs as well as program coordinator for the Special Education and Educational Technology Program.  He also served as one of the primary investigators for the FUTURE Post-Secondary Education Program, a two-year program for college students with intellectual disabilities and autism. He has received numerous honors from TPTE as well as the college and was honored as “Outstanding Alumni” from Georgia State University in 2011.

    Please join CEHHS is congratulating and welcoming Cihak to his new appointment as Interim Associate Dean of Professional Licensure and Director of the David T. Bailey Graduate School of Education.

    Jeffrey Fairbrother Education, Health & Human Sciences

    Fairbrother Appointed Associate Dean of Academic and Faculty Affairs

     
    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences (CEHHS) is pleased to announce that Jeff Fairbrother has accepted appointment to the position of Associate Dean of Academic and Faculty Affairs.  He has been serving as interim in this position since May, 2016.

    Fairbrother joined the administrative team in the college coming from the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies (KRSS).  His career with the college began in 2003 when he accepted a position as assistant professor in Exercise, Sport, and Leisure Studies (now KRSS), reaching the rank of full professor in 2015. Prior to this appointment, Fairbrother also served as interim department head and then department head of KRSS for a total of four years.  He was awarded the 2015 Dean’s Leadership Award in our college and was also a Fellow in the 2015 Southeastern Conference Academic Leadership Development Program.

    Please join CEHHS in congratulating and welcoming Fairbrother to his position as Associate Dean of Academic and Faculty Affairs.

    South Knoxville Elementary School Supply Drive Flier

    Dean’s Staff Advisory Board School Supply Drive

     
    The Dean’s Staff Advisory Board for the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences is currently collecting school supplies for our adopted school, South Knoxville Elementary.  Supplies needed include any type of office supplies, books, toys and games in new and/or gently used condition appropriate for grades K-5.

    Donation drop-off locations are:

    • Wendy Smith-HPER 390 (Public Health)
    • Amy Clayton-JHB 115 (Child & Family Studies)
    • Bonnie Maples-CC 424 (ISC)

    Donations will be collected through January 31st so be sure to bring them in soon!

     

     

    sport management class

    Sport Management Degree Program Ranked 12th by College Choice

     
    The College of Education, Health and Human Science’s Sport Management Degree Program in the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation and Sport Studies has been recognized as twelfth in the nation as ranked by College Choice.  

    College Choice, an online ranking service only ranks accredited programs when gathering their data. Then the top five reasons a student might choose a college such as 1) Quality of the program, 2) Reputation, 3) Affordability, 4) Value and 5) Satisfaction are evaluated for the program.  These results are then calculated and based upon the results of these reasons, the program is then given it’s ranking.

    To learn more about the ranking and others included in the list, you can find the information on the College Choice website.

    Knox County Schools Logo

    Cultural Competency Training Contract Approved by Knox County Schools

     
    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences realizes the disproportions occurring in academic achievement and discipline in Knox County Schools.  This realization is a necessary step to eliminating systemic challenges in the achievement gap and implicit bias which occurs.

    Two of our faculty, Chonika Coleman-King and Jud Laughter of the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education, are well aware of these issues. In response, they have developed a multi-year plan to address the various categories of diversity, implicit bias, identity, culturally relevant pedagogy and family engagement. This plan will breach up to five years to assist with sustainability efforts.  The commitment and proximity of these faculty will allow for collaboration with local administrators to assess and hone their services over the course of the project to ensure the plans effectiveness.  The first stage will include a series of workshops for all Knox County employees.  During the second stage, Cultural Competence Learning Committees will be formed to develop Sustainability Plans and will include a schedule of support for these employees as they work with their schools in planning professional development opportunities.

    On Monday, December 11th, the University of Tennessee’s contract for Cultural Competency training was approved and passed unanimously.  Training will begin in 2018.

     

    Nutrition Logo

    Graduate Students in Department of Nutrition Receive Scholarships

    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences congratulates two outstanding graduate students in our Department of Nutrition.  Both have been awarded scholarships to assist in their academics.

    Marissa Black received the Commission on Dietetic Registration Diversity Scholarship for 2017-2018 from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation.

    Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics FoundationMiranda Fulmer was also received the Frances E. Fischer Memorial Scholarship for 2017-2018 from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation.

    These scholarships, from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation, will assist Black and Fulmer in their pursuit of a career in nutrition and dietetics.  As members of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, these ladies are among those in the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professions committed to accelerating improvements in global health and well-being through food and nutrition.

     

     

    Gary Rose received Accomplished Alumni Award

    Dean’s Board of Advisors Member Receives Accomplished Alumni Award

    Gary Rose (CEHHS, ’85) was presented with an Accomplished Alumni Award from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville on December 6, 2017 by the associate vice chancellor of development, Steve Catlett.

    Rose, who is based in Knoxville, currently serves on UT Knoxville Alumni Association Board of Directors, is an integral member of the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences (CEHHS) Dean’s Board of Advisors andhas served as chair of the Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity Board of Governors.  He serves as the Division President with Reinhart Foodservice.

    Catlett said Roses’ passion for UT, Knoxville and his true Volunteer spirit would be hard to match because he has proven it with his time, talent, and treasure.

    In 2013, Gary and his wife, Donna Rose (Haslam ’87), honored their roots by creating scholarships in both CEHHS and The Haslam College of Business.  These scholarships are awarded to students from their hometowns of Franklin, Ohio and Greeneville, Tennessee.

    Catlett stated that “over the years, the Accomplished Alumni Award has been presented to astronauts, authors, Olympians, CEOs and media personalities, to name a few. And like Gary, they all represent what one can achieve with a University of Tennessee degree.”

    Rose had humbled beginnings like most entry-level employees but with hard work and determination, he earned opportunities to show his leadership skills in high-level positions at US Foods, as owner and president of FMS Solutions, and now division president with Reinhart Foodservice.

    Rose shared advice and experience about his career in foodservice as well as his thoughts on serving his alma mater to a group of students and special guests.

    When surprised with the award at the event, Rose said “I am both humbled and honored to receive this award. Because of my involvement with the University of Tennessee, I have had wonderful opportunities in life and have been truly blessed”

    Ann Fairhurst, department head of Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management (RHTM) in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences said “Since his return to Knoxville, Gary has been active with our department.  He graciously helped sponsor a recent Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism alumni event and continually offers his expertise to our department.  He is very deserving of this award and we look forward to his continued partnership with our department.

    Gary Rose Receives Accomplished Alumni AwardTo add to the celebrations, Gary and Donna Rose also celebrated 25 years of marriage at the UT Visitors Center event.  The location was not only the planned event venue to honor the accomplished alum, but also the site of their wedding reception in December 1992.

    The Roses reside in Knoxville and have two children attending the University of Tennessee, Alan (21, Senior in Business) and Chrissy (19, Sophomore in CEHHS).

    Dorian McCoy and Gresham Collom

    PERC Graduate Student Receives First Grant

     
    Congratulations to Gresham Collom, graduate student in the Postsecondary Education Research Center, who received his first grant as a PhD student along with Dorian McCoy.

    The Postsecondary Education Research Center, a part of the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies department, identifies and coordinates research initiatives designed to enhance higher education at the institutional, state, and national levels.

    Read more about this great opportunity for Collom.

    What Do These People Have in Common?

    They are all new faculty in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences!

    In addition to welcoming over 600 new students this fall, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences welcomed six new faculty members.  These faculty have more than 70 years of combined experience in their disciplines and bring not only vast reservoirs of knowledge but diverse life experiences. We are delighted to welcome our new faculty members to a community committed to excellence and enhancing the quality of life through research, outreach, and practice.

    Brittany N. Anderson, PhD

    Assistant Professor, Theory and Practice in Teacher Education

    University of Georgia (PhD)

     

    A native Texan, Brittany has general education teaching experience in kindergarten and second grade. For the past several years, Brittany has been involved in the professional development of in-service teachers in urban school districts around issues of recruitment and retention of culturally, linguistically, linguistically, and economically diverse students for gifted services and programming.

    Brittany’s research focuses on pre-service and in-service teacher professional development around talent development and talent identification of underrepresented youth in Title I schools. Brittany’s research also focuses on the development/impact of teacher preparation programs on cultivating culturally competent teachers.

    Recent Faculty Highlights

    • National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) 2017 Doctoral Student Award
    • Hines, M. E., Anderson, B. N., & Grantham, T. C. (2017). Promoting opportunity, rigor, and achievement for underrepresented students. In Eckert, R. & Robins, J. (2nd ed.)
    • Designing Programs and Services for High-Ability Learners: A Guidebook for Gifted Education (pp. 151-168). Washington, DC: Corwin Press and National Association for Gifted Children.

    What’s your favorite thing about Knoxville?

    I love the Smoky Mountain being in our backyard. I’ve greatly enjoyed the hikes and scenic views.

    What does being a Volunteer mean to you?

    Being a Volunteer means being dedicated to my students in preparing them to be phenomenal leaders in our Nation’s classrooms, being committed to solid research, and serving in reciprocal, mutually-beneficial relationships with the community to identify and respond to community issues and needs.

    Madrid

     

    Assistant Professor, Child and Family Studies

    The Ohio State University (PhD)

     

     

    Samara is a white female, mother of three children and grandmother of 5 children. She was born and raised in Chula Vista, California but moved to the Big Island of Hawaii at the age of 12 and lived there for 17 years.

    Her research has focused on the emotional lives of adults and children in early childhood classrooms using collaborative ethnographic methods. Her research also examines early childhood educators development of intercultural competence and intercultural relationships while teaching in Nepal.

    Recent Faculty Highlights

    • Awarded the 2017 Innovative Course Grant from the University of Wyoming.
    • I have a forthcoming co-edited book with Dr. Mary Jane Moran and Dr. Robyn Brookshire entitled Collaborative Cross-Cultural Research Methodologies in Early Care and Education Contexts. This will be published by Routledge Press in December 2017.
    • On the International Outreach Committee for the Association for Childhood Education International.

    What’s your favorite thing about Knoxville?

    The humidity, rain, and green areas remind me of Hilo, Hawaii. It makes me feel at home!

    What does being a Volunteer mean to you? Striving to be my best self and helping others to do the same; I am extremely proud to be part of the Volunteer community.

    Harper

     

    Assistant Professor, Theory and Practice in Teacher Education

    Michigan State University (PhD)

     

    Frances earned her PhD in mathematics education at Michigan State University (2017) and two master’s degrees related to mathematics education, one at Harvard University in Mathematics for Teaching (2011) and the second at Stanford University in Curriculum and Teacher Education (2012). She was PK-12 educator, teaching mathematics, reading, and English in various urban contexts, for eight years, and she has been involved with the professional development of practicing and prospective mathematics educators in different capacities since 2007.

    Her research broadly focuses on issues of equity and social justice in mathematics education and teacher education, particularly within urban contexts. She strives to support teachers to enact equity-minded teaching practices (e.g., complex instruction, math for social justice) and to understand students’ experiences with those teaching efforts.

    Recent Faculty Highlights

    • Lead author on two chapters in the recently published book, Building support for scholarly practices in mathematics methods, the final volume in the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators Professional Book Series. This book is the product of collaborations among 40 mathematics teacher educators across the country.

    What’s your favorite thing about Knoxville? What does being a Volunteer mean to you? My favorite thing about Knoxville is the abundance of spaces for outdoor recreation. My dogs and I love the various parks and greenways, and we look forward to exploring the nearby mountains and lakes.

    What does being a Volunteer mean to you?

    To me, being a Volunteer means devoting my time and energy to community outreach and service. I strive to build partnerships with teachers, families, and other community members towards improving the educational experiences and opportunities of children.

     

    Assistant Professor, Child and Family Studies

    University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign (PhD)

     

     

    Megan grew up in Marietta, Georgia and upon graduating headed north to the Midwest for college (Indiana University) and graduate school (University of Illinois). Upon earning her degree, she took a southern route to Auburn University where she was a faculty member for 4 years before joining the Child and Family Studies department at the University of Tennessee.

    Megan’s research is two-fold: 1) Along with a team of researchers and community partners, including the Knoxville Family Justice Center, she is interested in better understanding the help-seeking experiences of victims/survivors of domestic violence; 2) She is also interested in better understanding the experiences of young adults who were exposed to father-mother domestic violence during their childhood and adolescence, with a focus on their coping strategies and resilience.

    Any accomplishments we might include?

    Recent Faculty Highlights

    • Research has been published in a variety of family studies and family violence journals, including Psychology of Violence; Journal of Interpersonal Violence; Trauma, Violence, and Abuse; and, Journal of Marriage and Family.
    • Serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Marriage and Family
    • Recently presented a webinar presentation on my research on “the cycle of violence” for the Battered Women’s Justice Project.
    • Chair-elect for the Feminism and Family Studies Section in the National Council of Family Relations.
    • Recently received two awards: Samia I. Spencer Creative Mentorship Award in Women’s Studies (Auburn University) and the Cindy Winter Scholarship Award (National Council on Family Relations).

    What’s your favorite thing about Knoxville? My favorite things about

    Knoxville is the Saturday Farmer’s Market and the diversity of restaurants and outdoor activities.

    What does being a Volunteer mean to you? Being a volunteer means making the deliberate decision to be an active and engaged community citizen through advocacy sharing of my time and resources.

     

    Assistant Professor, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

    California Lutheran University (EdD)

     

    James has 20+ years of instructional and leadership experiences, including teaching and administrative roles in public, private, parochial and boarding school environments. In addition, he has served as Accreditation Visiting Committee Chairperson for the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), Lead Instructor for the Johns Hopkins University Engineering Innovation Program, Member of the Academic Senate, Grant Co-Principal Investigator and Dean of Education Search Committee member.

    He has substantive experience in developing quantitative and qualitative research design methods for data collection and devising/implementing interventions for early career teachers/administrators to increase student success in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). He is the National Co-Leader of the Association of Public & Land-Grant Universities (APLU) Secondary Teacher Retention in Diverse Educational Settings (STRIDES) Research Action Cluster, leading a collaborative team of teacher education, mathematics faculty and school district partners to increase retention of math teachers across the United States.

    Recent Faculty Highlights

    • Martinez and his teachers were awarded the 2012 California School Board Association (CSBA) Golden Bell Award for Community Partnerships. In 2016, he was nominated by his students for the Maximus Award for Teaching and Student Support.
    • Martinez, J.A., Mathematics Attitudes and Achievement of U.S. High School Sophomores Based on Race, Academy for Educational Studies (AES) Journal of Critical Questions in Education (ISSN 2327-3607), Vol. 8, Issue 1, January, 2017
    • Co-Principal Investigator – $1.28M California Mathematics Readiness Challenge Grant Initiative (CMCGI), offered by the California Department of Education (CDE).
    • Annual Speaker for Regional/National Conferences:  School Science and Mathematics Association (SSMA), North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PMENA) and  National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM)

    What’s your favorite thing about Knoxville? Rowing on the Tennessee River 

    What does being a Volunteer mean to you? Being a gracious and effective collaborator in supporting my department (ELPS) with their efforts to effectively prepare our graduate students for future service in K-12 and higher education institutions.  Also, forming substantive connections with local/regional/state/national institutions to develop research/practice to improve student learning experiences.

     

    Assistant Professor, Child and Family Studies

    Georgia State University (PhD)

     

     

    Margaret studied humanities during her undergraduate and initial graduate degrees but switched to social science.  Eventually, she was led to teaching; She taught in preschool classrooms in the US and in Northern Ireland for five years.

    Margaret’s research interest is in children’s early writing: the nature, measurement, and development of these foundational skills.  Further she is interested in teachers’ practices around early writing and emergent literacy and their impact on child outcomes concurrently and longitudinally.

    Recent Faculty Highlights

    • Finished my PhD in May at Georgia State University and was awarded with the best dissertation in my college (the College of Education and Human Development).

    What’s your favorite thing about Knoxville? I love the small-town feeling of Knoxville.  I know my neighbors and they know me. It makes for a nice community, even though we are so new to town.

    What does being a Volunteer mean to you? Being a volunteer means helping whenever you can, wherever you can, however you can.

     

    Assistant Professor, Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management

    Oklahoma State University (PhD)

     

     

    Boham has worked as a registered dietitian, restaurant and wine marketing manager, and culinary assistant

    Her research interests are in food safety, local/sustainable food consumption, healthy eating environment, and entrepreneurship in the hospitality industry

    Recent Faculty Highlights

    • Published 6 articles and received 2 research awards.

    What’s your favorite thing about Knoxville?  I am excited to be exploring a new life in Knoxville, TN


              

    Photo of tourism class with guest speaker, Josh Loebner

    Inclusiveness in the Tourism Industry

    Photo of CEHHS Student Marketing Ambassador Ella KoehlMy name is Ella Koehl. I am a senior Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management major and a College Student Marketing Ambassador. One of the reasons why I love my major, are the professors. They are not just professors, they are role models I look up to. Our professors bring guest speakers into our classes, giving us real life insight into the industry. Below is a summary from a recent guest speaker, Josh Loebner of Designsensory.

    “I’m partially blind and visually impaired, which gives me a unique perspective, but I always clearly see the best in everyone”. – Josh Loebner

    Photo of tourism class with guest speaker, Josh Loebner

    Today, our Critical Sustainable Tourism class was able to listen to special guest Josh Loebner, Director of Strategy for a local Knoxville company, Designsensory. He spoke about the inclusiveness of those who identify as disabled within the tourism and advertising world.

    Josh Loebner suffers from severe sight impairments, including partial blindness, which sometimes leaves his travel experiences confusing, and prevents his ability to operate machinery. However, he does not let his impairment influence his career. Loebner worked on Madison Avenue, when he decided to return for a Master’s degree in advertisement, and continues to work in the industry with companies including Crystal Light and Advil. Last year, he was elected onto the City of Knoxville Mayor’s Council on Disability Issues for a three-year term, and also served as the 2015-16 District 7 Diversity Chair.

    During his presentation, Loebner gave ideas on how individuals in the workforce can increase the relationships between diversity and inclusion, in addition to how this inclusion can benefit those companies who embrace the inclusion of people with disabilities in their advertisements. His hope is to bring awareness to disabled individuals by presenting them within the advertisement and tourism industry. The presentation was motivating and inspirational. Josh Loebner brought a perspective most had not experienced and brought a light on an issue that needs attention from all.

    2017 Colloquium Group

    2018 Graduate Student Research Colloquium

     
    Are you a graduate student in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences?  Have you been diligently working on gathering research and would like an opportunity to present it in a conference setting?  Then this event is for you!2017 colloquium presenters

    The 2018 Graduate Student Colloquium is coming soon!  Participants for this event are selected by the 2017-18 Dean’s Graduate Student Advisory board so submit your abstract now.  Deadline is January 17, 2018.  The event will be held on March 2, 2018.

    More details about the event, how to submit an abstract, helpful layout templates, etc. are available on our website. 

    We hope to see you there!

    Paula Franklin receives Milken Educator Award

    CEHHS Alumna Receives Nationally Recognized $25,000 Milken Educator Award

    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences congratulates Paula Roush Franklin, 2011 graduate, awarded the Milken Educator Award.  She is one of only two recipients in the State of Tennessee to be chosen for this award during 2017.  And according to her test results, it is a reward well deserved.  Eighty-two percent of students in her classes pass the AP Government exam with scores above the national average.

    The Milken Educator Awards are also known as the “Oscars of Teaching.”  The initiative rewards great teachers as well as celebrates, elevates and activates those innovators in the classroom that are guiding America’s next generation of leaders.

    Franklin graduated from the University of Tennessee with a Bachelor of Arts in political science and minors in history and secondary education in 2010.  She then received her master’s in Secondary Education in 2011 through the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education. 

    Read more about Franklin, the award, and watch Franklin’s surprise as she is presented with this honor. 

    Image courtesy of The Milken Family Foundation

    Lee Murphy Nutritionist discussing healthy thanksgiving alternatives

    UT Professor Dishes Up Healthy Holiday Hacks

    There are many delicious temptations during the holidays, but the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences’ Department of Nutrition professor Lee Murphy says there’s always room to hack your favorite recipe in order to reduce calories from added fats and sugars.

    “If you can maintain the same amazing taste with just slight variations of the recipe, why not?” said Murphy. “It will satisfy your craving and save your waistline from expanding.”

    Murphy offers up the following healthy hacks for this holiday season:

    Applesauce. Use to replace oil or butter in cake-like recipes. Replace half the amount of butter in your recipe with applesauce. For example, if the recipe calls for one cup of butter, use half a cup of butter and half a cup of applesauce. If you don’t mind a bread that’s more dense and moist, replace all the butter with applesauce to cut even more calories and fat.

    Bananas. Use one mashed banana to replace an egg in sweet quick bread recipes.

    Puréed grapes. To reduce the white sugar in recipes, try replacing it with puréed grapes. You’ll need to adjust the dry ingredients a bit to ensure your baked goods aren’t too moist.

    Avocados. Substitute half the amount of butter in a baking recipe with mashed avocado—it works well with cookies. Use the same method as you would when substituting applesauce. Using avocado not only lowers the calorie content but also creates softer, chewier baked goods. This substitution is ideal if you want to omit the dairy.

    Greek yogurt. Replace half the amount of butter in your cookie recipes with half as much lower-fat plain Greek yogurt. For example, if the recipe calls for one cup of butter, use half a cup of butter and a quarter cup of yogurt. You’ll reduce the calories and the saturated fat. You may want to play around with using more yogurt and less butter to see if you still like the taste and consistency.

    Prune purée. Use as a low-fat alternative to butter. Whatever amount of butter the recipe calls for, replace it completely with store-bought baby food prune purée (if you want to make your own, purée prunes in the food processor). This option works well in recipes that involve chocolate and cinnamon.

    Below is Murphy’s recipe for hacked banana apple-chunk bread:

    Ingredients:

    2 ripe bananas

    1 apple, diced

    1/2 cup sugar

    1 3/4 cups whole-wheat flour

    1/2 cup applesauce

    1 teaspoon baking soda

    1 teaspoon salt

    1 teaspoon cinnamon

    1 tablespoon chopped walnuts (optional)

    Directions: Preheat oven to 350°F. Lightly spray a 9-inch loaf pan. In a medium-sized bowl, mash the bananas with a fork. Add the diced apple, sugar, flour, applesauce, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon to the bowl and mix well. Pour into greased pan and sprinkle with chopped walnuts. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out dry. Cool in pan before transferring to a cooling rack.

    Article as featured in TN TodayBe sure to check out Lee as featured on WBIR-Channel 10.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Knox County Retired Teacher Association Scholarship Foundation Awards Ceremony award recipients

    Scholarship Foundation Awards Ceremony

    The Knox County Retired Teachers Association held their Scholarship Foundation Awards Ceremony today.  Recipients of awards are enrolled in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences in various majors.  Some of the awards were presented by David Royse and Loneka Battiste; both from the University of Tennessee School of Music.

    scholarship recipientsRecipients included:

    Robin Byard-Elementary Education

    Sarah Grace Jones-Special Education

    Hannah Reddick-Music Education

    David Woods-Music Education

    Congratulations to the recipients!

     

    Education 100 Class Holds Poster Presentation Sessions

    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences Education 100 course held it’s once a semester poster presentation by enrolled students.  The introductory course is for students interested in pursuing careers in education.  Students engage in a service learning experience in conjunction with school-based placements where they work with mentoring teachers to engage students in the application of new knowledge and skills through projects related to education youth.

    ed100 am group

    The morning session was held from 9:40-10:55 A.M. today in the Claxton Commons.  Students displayed the results from topics such as “Developing Better Social Skills in Preschool,”Writing Document Based Essays,” and “Improving Math and Writing Skills.”

     

     

    ed100 afternoonStudents also presented posters in the afternoon session of the class from 2:30-3:30 P.M. today.  Topics in this group included “How to Write a Thesis Statement,” and “Writing an Essay.”

    Walk Ins Welcome Graphic

    Walk-In Advising

    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences Office of Advising and Student Services is hosting “Walk-In Advising.

    Walk-In Advising Hours for November 13-16th

    8:00-11:30 A.M.

    1:00-3:30 P.M.

    November 14th is also the last day to drop a full-term course with a “W” deadline.

    The Office of Advising and Student Services is located at 332 Bailey Education Complex, 1122 Volunteer Boulevard, Knoxville, TN 37996.  You can reach them by phone or online to schedule your advising appointment also.

    7 careers for Kinesiology

    7 Career Options for Kinesiology Majors

    Anna Alston CEHHS Student AmbassadorMy name is Anna Alston. I am a senior Kinesiology major and a College Student Marketing Ambassador. After college, I plan on attending Physician’s Assistants school and working in Emergency Medicine. Although I chose Physician’s Assistants school, below are some other career paths to consider with a Kinesiology degree from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

    Nurse Anesthetist, Nurse Practitioner, and Nurse Midwife

    • Job Responsibilities- Coordinate patient care, may provide primary or secondary healthcare.
    • Required Education- Master’s Degree
    • Average Salary- $107,460

    Othotist and Prosthetist

    • Job Responsibilities- Design and fabricate medical supportive devices. Fit, size, and measure patients for devices including; artificial limbs, braces, and surgical devices.
    • Required Education- Master’s Degree
    • Average Salary- $65,360

    Diagnostic Medical Sonographer and Cardiovascular Technologist

    • Job Responsibilities- Operate imaging equipment to conduct tests or create images to help with the diagnosis and assessment of a patient.
    • Required Education- Associate’s Degree
    • Average Salary- $64,280

    Epidemiologist- Physical Activity

    • Job Responsibilities- Public health professional who investigate the cause and patterns of diseases and injuries. They strive to reduce the risk and occurrence of negative health by increasing community education, research, and increasing health policies.
    • Required Education- Master’s Degree
    • Average Salary- $70,820

    Exercise Physiologist

    • Job Responsibilities- Develop a fitness and exercise program to help patients improve cardiac function, flexibility, and body composition. Also aid in chronic disease recovery.
    • Required Education- Bachelor’s Degree
    • Average Salary- $47,340

    Fitness Trainer and Instructor

    • Job Responsibilities- Lead, instruct, and teach individuals in exercise activities. These activities increase cardiovascular endurance, strength, and flexibility.
    • Required Education- High school diploma or equivalent
    • Average Salary- $38,160

    Respiratory Therapist

    • Job Responsibilities- Care for patients who are experiencing trouble breathing. Patient ages range from premature infants to elderly patients. They also provide care to emergency patients suffering from heart attack or shock.
    • Required Education- Associates Degree
    • Average Salary- $58,670

     All information acquired from the Bureau of Industry and Security.

    students in science lab

    CEHHS Congratulates VolsTeach Scholarship Recipients

     

    Trentham Scholarship Recipient Photo

    Rachel Trentham, Alana Cooper, Maria VanAudenhove, Brent Trentham

    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences congratulates the 2017-18 recipients of scholarships by students enrolled in the VolsTeach program.  Scholarships for those in VolsTeach are awarded to students who will, upon graduation, teach in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.  These recipients are seniors in their majors and will either begin or complete their apprentice teaching in Fall, 2018.

    Learn more about the recipients and the generous donors that make these scholarships possible!

    Robert Lieberthal, featured on Inside Tennessee

    Public Health Assistant Professor Featured on Inside Tennessee Discussing Health Insurance

     
    Rob Liberthal, Phd and Assistant Professor in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences Department of Public Health was featured Sunday, October 29 on Inside Tennessee during which the topic of discussion was pending health care.

    Lieberthal, author of “What is Health Insurance (Good) For?  An Examination of Who Gets It, Who Pays for It, and How to Improve It” was joined by panelists, Don Bosch, Knoxville attorney with the Bosch Law Firm, and Susan Richardson Williams of SRW & Associates, Public Affairs Consultant to discuss legislation surrounding healthcare.  Topics included what works with our current available insurance, the current affordable healthcare act, what is coming in the future, costs including deductibles and other factors which will affect our future healthcare.

    Lieberthal’s appearance on Inside Tennessee can be viewed through these links.  The segment is divided into four segments due to length.


     

    Chris Ndiritu, Recipient of the SACSA Graduate Student Award

    CSP Student Receive SACSA Graduate Student Award

     
    The College Student Personnel Program located in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies is proud to share that our 2018 Cohort student, Chris Ndiritu, has been awarded the Southern Association for College Student Affairs (SACSA) award for Outstanding Graduate Student for 2017.

    Chris Ndiritu, Recipient of the SACSA Graduate Student AwardChris has demonstrated “academic achievement, campus involvement and potential for significant contributions to the Student Affairs profession” per the qualification guidelines for the award.  While working towards his degree, Chris is also an Assistant Hall Director for Hess Hall.

    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences congratulates you Chris!  Read more about the SACSA; an organization “providing cooperative assocation and professional development for professionals engaged in college student affairs work.”

    Dr. Sarah Hillyer at Toyota Olympics Paralympics

    CSPS Director Leads Panel at Groundbreaking Toyota Mobility Summit in Greece

     
    A University of Tennessee professor was recently in Athens, Greece to experience history, as Toyota’s revealed its groundbreaking transformation from an automobile company to a mobility company at the forefront of the movement for accessibility and inclusion.

    Dr. Sarah Hillyer, Toyota Olympics Paralympics In October, Sarah Hillyer, Ph.D., director of UT’s Center for Sport, Peace, & Society, was the only university representative to travel as a panelist for the Toyota Mobility Summit, where the company organized key international leaders and influencers in inclusion to announce the “Start Your Impossible” campaign. Hillyer moderated a panel with Tatyana McFadden, a 17-time Paralympic medalist and the only athlete—male, female, disabled, non-disabled—to win four of the world’s major marathons in four consecutive years, and Deborah McFadden, a co-author of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    “I’m so proud of Toyota’s vision for the future of mobility,” Hillyer said. “And what an honor it was to talk with Deborah and Tatyana—both forces for social mobility and the power of sport to transform lives and policy.”

    Toyota Start Your Impossible  LogoIn Toyota’s official statement announcing Start Your Impossible, as well as the fully accessible Mobility for All website, the company explained that its vision of mobility extends beyond cars into innovative technologies that improve the quality of life of all people. These technologies include the three-wheel i-Road, the stair-climbing motorized wheelchair, i-Bot, the Human Support Robot, and the Physical Rehabilitation Aid Robot.

    Hillyer has spent almost 30 years leading sports projects for women, refugees, and people with disabilities in more than 15 countries. She and assistant director Ashleigh Huffman, Ph.D., founded the Center for Sport, Peace, & Society in 2012. Since its founding, the center has promoted inclusion of people with disabilities both locally and globally. In 2016, it partnered with the U.S. Department of State to lead Sport for Community, a mentorship-based program partnering international leaders in the disability sport sector with U.S. mentors at organizations such as the U.S. Olympic Committee, Lakeshore Foundation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Network, and the National Ability Center. Last year, the center and student-athletes in the VOLeaders Academy also organized the first UT Sports Fest, an inclusive sports festival where community members of all ability levels experienced adaptive sports and activities such as tandem cycling, blindfolded soccer, and sitting volleyball.

    To find more information about the Toyota Mobility Summit, including photos and videos of the “Start Your Impossible” campaign, visit the following link.

    STEM Meeting attendees signing in

    East TN Stem Hub Regional Meeting & Open House

     

    The Center for Enhancing Education in Mathematics and Sciences (CEEMS) hosted the first regional meeting and open house under the new management of CEEMS.  Attendees had the opportunity to discuss STEM professional development and other factors regarding STEM in their organizations.Participants at STEM Hub Regional Meeting & Open House

    More about the event can be found on the Theory and Practice in Teacher Education website. 

    Student in adaptive sport class

    Game On for Everyone

    Written by Sarah Fisher, CEHHS Student Marketing Ambassador and student in the Adaptive Recreation class and FUTURE program.

    This fall is the inaugural semester of the new Adaptive Recreation class. It is an eight week Physical Education class on Tuesdays and Thursdays instructed by Nick Geicek and Dr. Scott. The class offers individuals of different disabilities and impairments the opportunity to play sports. Some of the sports we have played this fall are sitting volleyball, bocce ball, and adaptive basketball. The process of making this a course on campus started last spring, when Dr. Scott was speaking to a group of Recreation Sports Management students about Therapeutic Recreation and its programs for the public. One of the students asked, “What do you offer UT students with disabilities?” This one question sparked a movement to offer such a course right here on campus.

    Now, graduate student Nick Geicek instructs the Adaptive Recreation class. I asked him what the purpose of the course was and he said, “to expose Therapeutic Recreation students to another side of the field, adaptive sports, while also providing a recreational outlet for UT students with disabilities and impairments. Our ultimate goal is to create an environment in which able-bodied and disabled students can learn, develop skills, and have fun playing sports together.”

    For undergrad, Nick majored in Therapeutic Recreation here at the University of Tennessee. He was excited to teach the course for the opportunity to learn more about adaptive sports. Nick explains, “Since this class has never been offered at UT, I have been trying a lot of different strategies and implementation techniques to find the most effective ways to teach these sports to my students.”

    Some of my favorite sports from the class are sitting volleyball, bocce ball, and adaptive basketball. I asked Nick which sports have been his favorite so far and he said, “My favorite adaptive sport that we have played is probably sitting volleyball. It was a lot of fun because none of the students have played it before, so it was great to see how much they learned and how much they improved in a matter of weeks.” For the future, Nick said, “A sport I look forward to playing that we have not done yet is wheelchair basketball. Wheelchair basketball would not only be a beneficial sport for students to learn, I think it will also help us attract even more students to take this program to the next level.”

    “My favorite part of the class is being able to enjoy time with my peers and learn how to adapt sports for everyone to play.”

    I asked a few students some questions about the course. Maddy Young said, “My favorite part of the class is being able to enjoy time with my peers and learn how to adapt sports for everyone to play.” I went on to ask the students why they chose to take the class. Morgan King said, “I thought learning about adaptive sports would be really helpful in achieving my career goals. I want to be an occupational therapist and adaptive sports are a large part of that profession.” When talking to Maddy Young about the challenges of the course, she said, “Some challenges I have faced are learning to not be as competitive for the enjoyment of others.” Lastly, I asked what was the biggest surprise while taking the course. “I was surprised at how different the adaptive sport can be from the way that I’ve always played,” said Morgan King. “I love seeing how different everyone is, and that one way of doing something for somebody may be hard, but that same way for someone else may make things so much easier for them.”

    If you are a student at the University of Tennessee and are interested in taking this course or want to find out more information, talk to Dr. Scott or Nick Giecek to see how you can get involved!

    CEHHS Student Awards Celebration

    2017 CEHHS Student Awards Celebration

     

    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences celebrated their outstanding students as they presented the 2017 Student Awards at the annual celebration on October 12, 2017, held at the Hilton Hotel Downtown.  The awards were presented by the administration of the college to students who were recognized as recipients of a multitude of awards, fellowships, endowments, and scholarships.  Congratulations to these students for their tremendous efforts and recognition for an outstanding job.

    Enjoy photos from the event here. A full listing of the awards presented can be found here.

    Big Orange College tour group

    Big Orange College Tour

    Has anyone ever told you to “never judge a book by its cover”? Well, I’m adding to the phrase: never judge an institution by its type.

    College Student Personnel Universities VisitLast week, my graduate program of College Student Personnel spent three full days visiting Belmont University, Fisk University, the University of Tennessee at Martin, and West Kentucky Community Technical College to learn about how these institutions worked. While I will probably wait a while before hopping on a bus again, I am definitely thankful for the chance to see my learning in action. Meeting with student affairs professionals, asking questions, and looking behind-the-scenes at how students are served at each location allowed me to build a better picture of this field I’m learning about at the University of Tennessee.

    The biggest lesson of the trip, though, was that my preconceived notions of what I thought I’d see were so wrong. My assumption that a small, rural community college wouldn’t be as impactful for students as a large, urban institution was shattered. I realized that, sometimes, tradition and a tight-knit community makes for a group of amazing student leaders. And I’m going to take this lesson into the rest of my career. As I continue my education at the University of Tennessee, I’m going to look for the gems within the University that make this institution amazing. I can’t wait to find them.

    Story written by Madison Merrifield, graduate student in the College Student Personnel program in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

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    Billie Grace Goodrich Distinguished Lecturer Marian Wright Edelman

    Bailey Graduate School of Education Hosted Billie Grace Goodrich Distinguished Lecturer, Marian Wright Edelman

    The David T. Bailey Graduate School of Education was honored to host Marian Wright Edelman, Founder of the Children’s Defense Fund, as the Billie Grace Goodrich Distinguished Lecturer.  Edelman presented her lecture, “The State of America’s Children” at the Holiday Inn World’s Fair Site on October 10th, to a crowded ballroom. Marian Wright Edelman with children from the Jack and Jill of America, Knoxville ChapterAttendance was open to the general public and also included alumni, Bailey Graduate School of Education and College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences students, faculty and staff, sisters from the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority and children from the Jack and Jill of America, Inc., Knoxville Chapter.  These children, working to earn the funds, presented Edelman with a $100 check for the Children’s Defense Fund which touched her heart.

    Edelman’s lecture shared her lifelong mission to end child poverty and how we, as the future, can make the difference.  She has been an advocate for American’s facing economic and other challenges her entire professional life being inspired by Harriet Tubman and Sojourner Truth, whom she refers to as “her ladies;” two historical African American women activists whose images she wears on pendants. Marian Wright Edelman and her ladies, Harriet Tubman & Sojourner Truth Pendants Encouraged by her parents, who made her always believe she could be anything, Edelman graduated from Spelman College and Yale Law School and became the first African American woman admitted to the Mississippi bar. To date, she has received over 100 honorary degrees and many awards, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Robert F. Kennedy Lifetime Achievement Award.  She is currently working to ensure that children will continue to have health care available (CHIP-Children’s Health Insurance Program), continually encourages teachers and parents to work together to change the odds for children, and for our nation to invest in prevention instead of spending funds to care for these children after it is too late.

    The lecture was presented by the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences, the David T. Bailey Graduate School of Education including the departments of Child and Family Studies, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Educational Psychology and Counseling and Theory and Practice in Teacher Education.

    Photos from the event can be enjoyed here.

    parent comforting child

    How to Deal With the Las Vegas Tragedy

    We are all aware of the horrific events that occurred in Las Vegas.  We find ourselves stunned, shocked, scared, confused, or even feeling guilty. How do we deal with it emotionally or how do we tell our children about these events?

    Laura Wheat, assistant professor of Counselor Education in the Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling and director of the Grief Outreach Initiative, shares her advice on how to cope with these feelings through several media interviews this week.  Each is a little different and offers a little different perspective on how to help yourself and your family deal with this tragedy.

    WATE-Channel 6

    WVLT-Channel 8

    WBIR-Channel 10

    Tennessee Today

     

     

    Susan Groenke teaching students

    Groenke Receives 2017-2018 Frank W. Harvey Award

     
    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences congratulates Susan Groenke, associate professor of English Education in the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education and director of the Center for Children’s and Young Adult Literature at the University of Tennessee.  Groenke is the 2017-2018 recipient of the Frank W. Harvey Professor Endowment.  The award will support her professional travel and other selected activities and efforts consistent with advancing excellence in secondary education throughout the year.

    Frank W. Harvey, formerly of Knoxville, served on the UT Development council under the direction of Joe Johnson.  As a major donor to the University of Tennessee, he established the Frank W. Harvey Professorship in 1998 in our college.

    Recognition for this award will occur at the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education’s 4th Annual Recognition Ceremony to be held on Thursday, October 10 at 4 P.M.  Her dedication to the promotion of literature and her dedication to teaching and encouraging reading through outreach is only one example of the work and love in the field of literature that exemplifies why Groenke is deserving of this award.

     

     

     

    Dining and Dialogue - Audiology header

    Dining & Dialogue: Audiology & Speech Pathology

     
    The Center for Career Development is hosting its next Dining & Dialogue focused on the career fields of Audiology & Speech Pathology!

    Dining & Dialogue provides you the chance to gain inside information about a career field or industry from UTK alumni who are working in a specific industry. This series will be learning from alum in the field of AUDIOLOGY & SPEECH PATHOLOGY offered through the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences. Hear how you can utilize your degree in the world of work. Practice your informational interviewing and networking skills. Ask work-related questions to professionals who are doing the jobs you want! Contact Erin Bennett, Career Counselor at eharvey9@utk.edu if you have any questions about registration.

    The event is Tuesday, Oct. 3rd 5pm-6pm in the Tyson Alumni House Conference Room.  Dinner is provided! Pre-registration on Hire-A-VOL is required.

    (Register for Dining and Dialogue on the Hire-A-VOL system (login to MyUTK and look in the My Services column); After completing a Profile, go to Events and click on Workshops.)

    Featured Alums:

    • Sally Baerman, Audiologist, Au.D., CCC-A, F-AAA- Bridgewater Hearing & Balance
    • Jennifer Harvey S. CCC-SLP -Speech/Language Pathologist- Knox Co. School System- Brickey McCloud Elementary School
    Global Sports Mentoring Program

    17 Women, 15 Countries, 5 Weeks=Women Empowerment Program

     
    Meet the class of the UT’s Center for Sport, Peace, and Society’s partnership with the US Department of State’s Global Sport Mentoring Program (GSMP).  These women are the sixth class which have attended the world’s leading mentoring program for women in sports.

    The Center for Sport, Peace and Society at the University of Tennessee’s College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences under the direction of Ashleigh Huffman and Sarah Hillyer, work in a cooperative partnership with the program which is hosted in Washington, D.C. The partnership allows these international leaders the opportunity to work with the best and brightest women in the world who are leaders in sports.

    Read more about the GSMP and the Center for Sport, Peace and Society in this Tennessee Today article.

    nutrition student in lab

    Apply For The FY18 Scholarly Activity and Research Incentive Fund (SARIF) Equipment and Infrastructure Fund Now!

     
    Are you looking for a way to enhance your research mission College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences faculty?  The call is out for the FY18 Scholarly Activity and Research Incentive Fund (SARIF) Equipment and Infrastructure Fund.  This award aims to enhance UT’s research mission by providing support for the acquisition of state-of-the-art or innovative equipment that will advance the research mission of the university or for the repair, replacement, or upgrade of critical research infrastructure.

    Prior awards have ranged from $570 to $81,000.

    Apply now!  The deadline is noon, October 13th! 

    Great Smoky Mountain Food Days

    Great Smoky Mountain Food Days Event

     
    Cowgirl Creamery, and the University of Tennessee Culinary Institute, through the Department of Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management, is hosting the 2017 Great Smoky Mountain Food Days.

    The event, October 6th & 7th will feature the following:

    Oct 6th-6:30 P.M. Beans & Cornbread Supper with music by guitarist, Steve Kaufman

    Oct 7th –  9 A.M.- 5 P.M.- Food, Lectures, and Demos featuring Artisans, Historians, & Sheri Castle, author of several southern cookbooks.

    Cowgirl Creamery was founded by two University of Tennessee alumna, Sue Conley and Peggy Smith.  After graduation, these two friends, with a baby blue Chevy van and a lifetime love for food, took a hippie trip to San Francisco where they established careers in some of San Francisco’s most famous kitchens which led them through a number of kitchens to end up making cheese.

    More info can be found at Great Smoky Mountain Food Days.

    Cheerleaders Praying Pre game Prayer

    New Center Launches in CEHHS

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences is proud to announce a new center in our college, the Center for the Study of Sport and Religion, housed within the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sports Studies.

    The center, under the leadership of Larz Dzikus, Rob Hardin, and Steven Waller with assistance from Zachary Smith, PhD student, was established to promote the scholarly study of religion and sport through teaching, research, and education/training as a unit.

    Be sure to congratulate all of these fine leaders as they launch their new center!

    Photo courtesy of WATE.

    Alumni Awards Dinner

    CEHHS Alumna Recognized at UT Alumni Board Awards Dinner

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences is proud to share that two of our Alumna were recognized at the UT Alumni Board Awards Dinner.

    Crissy Haslam, Distinguished Alumna AwardCongratulations to the First Lady of Tennessee and #CEHHS alumna, Crissy Haslam.  Crissy holds her master’s degree in college student personnel in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.  She has dedicated herself to enhancing the lives of children, teachers, and administration in her efforts to support education.

     

    Katie Cyphers, Alumni Promise AwardCEHHS also congratulates Katie Cyphers for receiving the Alumni Promise Award.  Katie earned her BS in special education in 2007 and an MS in teacher education in 2008, both from the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education.  In 2015, she founded Education Cures, a non-profit organization focused on developing and improving education programs in Sierra Leone, West Africa.  Katie is another great example of how our alums are enhancing lives.

    pat legacy marquee

    Pat Summitt Film Premiere a Magical Night of Surprises

    A magical night filled with standing ovations, special guests, and enough orange to fill an arena, was the culmination of a decade of hard work by two University of Tennessee professors who chronicled the story of how iconic Lady Vols coach Pat Summitt blazed a trail for women’s basketball in Iraq in a recent documentary film.

    Lady BallerzWith a sold-out crowd of more than 700 in attendance, Pat: A Legacy of Love premiered at the Bijou Theatre in downtown Knoxville on Sept. 7. Professors and co-directors of UT’s Center for Sport, Peace, & Society, Sarah Hillyer and Ashleigh Huffman filmed and produced much of the documentary during their time as Ph.D. students in sports sociology at UT. They were on-hand for the two-hour event, co-emceed by WBIR anchor Robin Wilhoit and former Lady Vol Michelle Brooke-Marciniak, with a star panel that followed the film screening.

    Pat Summitt Film Premiere a Magical Night of Surprises“Coach Summitt was a hero to so many of us on that stage. There will never be another like her. It was an honor for us to tell this story, to remind people of Pat’s legacy, her kindness and generosity, and the essence of her character that made her so beloved by the Knoxville community,” said Hillyer.

    The list of special guests who spoke about the impact Summitt made in their lives as women and athletes included former Lady Vol point guard and successful entrepreneur Michelle Brooke-Marciniak, current Tennessee head coach Holly Warlick, former Tennessee women’s athletics director Joan Cronan, and Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame president Dana Hart.

    The panel also included one woman who traveled more than 6,500 miles to be in attendance for the evening, Khoshee Mohammed, a woman who aspires to be the Pat Summitt of Iraq and the co-star of the documentary.

    Special Guests Sarah Hillyer, Khoshee Mohammed, Holly Warlick, Robin Wilhoit, Joan Cronan, Michelle Brooke-Marciniak, Dana Hart, Ashleigh HuffmanA girl’s basketball coach from the northern Iraqi city of Sulaymaniyah, and the first female basketball coach in her country, Mohammed walked on stage and the crowd welcomed her with a standing ovation. During a public Q&A session later, a United States military veteran who served during the Gulf War recounted her own struggles as a woman in Iraq and thanked Mohammed for not giving up against the odds. The two women embraced and the crowd again rose to applaud, wiping away tears.

    “To be honest, I think Knoxville needed this moment. To remember Coach Summitt, to laugh and cry together, and to find hope in the next generation of women and girls who will carry her legacy forward. It was a special night and one that I hope inspires simple acts of kindness and healing throughout the world, “ Huffman said.

    In 2007, Hillyer met a teenage Mohammed while leading basketball camps in Sulaymaniyah. The young woman dreamed of one day leading her own camps for girls in her community. But, there were only a handful of flat basketballs and a dire lack of equipment and support. As UT doctoral students, Hillyer and Huffman reached out to Summitt for extra basketballs to take back to the girls of Iraq.

    Summitt’s response was what Warlick called nothing out of the ordinary for the winningest coach in NCAA basketball history: she emptied the closets, sending basketballs, uniforms, equipment, and a recorded video message challenging the girls to never give up in their pursuit of basketball.

    Mohammed watched that message in a hot gym in Sulaymaniyah with Hillyer and her team of volunteer coaches. She later joined a group of Iraqi women who were invited to participate in two of Summitt’s basketball camps in 2009. She is now an English teacher and basketball coach to hundreds of girls in Sulaymaniyah.

    “This wasn’t planned,” Warlick said at the film premiere. “It wasn’t ‘we’re going to do this and it’s going to have this kind of impact on these kids.’ It was just a simple act of kindness.”

    Proceeds from the night’s event benefitted the Pat Summitt Foundation as well as Zhima Path of Life Girl’s Basketball Club in Iraq. Hillyer and Huffman are currently in conversations with Tyler Summitt and the Pat Summitt Foundation to arrange additional screenings throughout the United States as well as making the film available for digital download. Updates on the film can be found at patlegacyoflove.com or any of the Coaching Change social media handles @coachchangexo.

    Enjoy photos from the event.

    Join the Journey Logo

    “Join the Journey” Campaign Launches

    All this week, you will see impact items going up around campus.  Included in these will be:

    • 1,625 orange mortarboard decals on the Student Union windows facing the pedestrian bridge to represent new undergraduate scholarships awarded last year from the 613 scholarship funds created since 2012
    • 132 folding chairs placed along Ayres Hall South lawn to represent faculty awards, professorships, and chairs created since 2012
    • 236 hanging lights within the 2nd floor of Hodges Library to represent graduate fellowships and scholarships created since 2012
    • 4 sets of 54-piece tumbling tower blocks placed at four locations to represent college and unit-based priorities; Humanities Plaza, Torchbearer Plaza, Fred Brown Residence Hall Plaza, and the College of Law lobby
    • 558 pieces of sports equipment around Neyland Stadium’s gate #21 to represent comprehensive athletic excellence and our 558 student athletes.

    These items all represent accomplishments made at the university as we strive to set ourselves apart and create a student experience that reaches beyond the ordinary.  Our students are among the nations elite, we have higher graduation and retention rates than ever before, and we have recruited and retained the top minds in the world in faculty positions. All of these accomplishments wouldn’t have been possible without the generous donations from people just like you!  Our journey to become a premiere public research institution is possible with your help.

    Keep a watch around campus this week as the “Join the Journey” campaign kicks off officially Friday, September 22.  Consider how you can “Join the Journey” by making your leadership gift today!

    Bailey Graduate School of Education student

    Be Proud. Be Involved. Be Invested.

    Lady Vols Logo

    Lady Vols Name Reinstated; What It Means to Be a Lady

     
    The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences heard the announcement from our athletic director, along with most everyone else, as the name “Lady Vols” was reinstated yesterday for those who wish to be recognized as such.  The Lady Vols logo will reappear next year on gear and uniforms and the use of the name will be optional.

    The question is, “Will this affect how these athletes are viewed?  Will the term “lady” have an impact upon scholarships, tradition, legacy, excellence, their sisterhood, their traditions, or their empowerment?”  Two PhD students in Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sports Studies, Allison B. Smith and Jonathan Evans, did a study with Lars Dzikus, PhD, into the impact of the name upon the culture of the team.

    This article shares how the resistance or applause from various parties and the impact upon the students played a part in the decision regarding the name change.

     

    Norma Mertz & James Martinez at the cehhs convocation

    2017 CEHHS Fall Convocation

    The 2017 Fall Convocation for the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences was held on September 6, 2017, at the Holiday Inn, World’s Fair Site.  Faculty and staff from throughout the college were recognized for their accomplishments, new faces were introduced, and a time for fellowship, food, and fun was enjoyed by all!

    Committees throughout the college were introduced. The list is available for your reference.

    Enjoy these photos from the event!

    Bailey Graduate School of Education Graduate Student Lounge

    Bailey Graduate School of Education Graduate Student Lounge Opens

    The new Bailey Graduate School of Education Graduate Student Lounge is open for graduate student use. Located within the CMC (Curriculum Materials Center, A401 BEC), the lounge is set up as a relaxed and comfortable environment for small group meetings, study sessions, or meetings with your professor. The lounge will accommodate a maximum of 8 comfortably. There is also a multimedia projector and screen available and can be requested at time of reservation. It is not intended to be used as a classroom.

    Brett Herron

    Meet Brett Herron, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to Brett Herron.  Brett is currently a 4th grade math and science teacher at Roosevelt Elementary School, where he started as a kindergarten teacher in 2008. He received the 2014-2015 Elementary Teacher of the Year at Theodore Roosevelt Elementary, and has served on the Roosevelt Elementary School Leadership Team for 3 years. Brett holds a Bachelor of Science in Communications from East Tennessee State University, and a Master of Education in Elementary Education from Milligan College.

    Brett is an addition to the original 14 (now 15) fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Brett will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Brett will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations Brett for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    CEHHS Social Media Icon

    Two CEHHS Professors Named As Experience Learning Fellows

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences congratulates two of our professors named as 2017 Experience Learning Fellows. Experience Learning is a bold new initiative with the goal of transforming educational experience for undergraduate and graduate students at UT. These professors are making changes with this goal in mind.

    Jeff Davis, professor in the Theory and Practice in Teacher Education department, is part of our Educational Interpreting Program.  In his 435 Linguistics of American Sign Language course, Davis plans to include fieldwork, practicum, service-learning, simulation and gaming, role playing, undergraduate research and volunteer work.

    Karen Boyd, associate professor of practice in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.  Boyd plans to incorporate apprenticeships, clinics, fellowship, fieldwork, internships, and student teaching into her ELPS 450, Leadership in Transition Seminar class.

    Congratulations to these two professors on your vision and creativity and especially your drive to make positive changes in your classes.

    Lindsey Stinnett

    Meet Lindsey Stinnett, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to Lindsey Stinnett.  Lindsey is a master teacher, eighth-grade English teacher and the English/Language Arts Department chair at Vine Middle Magnet School. Previously, Lindsey served as an English teacher and instructional coach at West High School. She has a bachelor’s degree in political science from Furman University as well as master’s degrees in public administration and in theory and practice in teacher education from UT.

    Lindsey is one of 14 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Lindsey will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Lindsey will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations Lindsey for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    Billie Grace Goodrich Distinguished Lecturer Marian Wright Edelman

    Annual Billie Grace Goodrich Distinguished Lecture

    On Tuesday, October 10th, 2017, the David T. Bailey Graduate School of Education and the College of Education, Health & Human Sciences will host the 2017 Billie Grace Goodrich Distinguished Lecture.  The event is at the Holiday Inn, World’s Fair Park.  Event starts at 5:15 P.M. with a reception and lecture follows at 6 P.M.

    Goodrich Logo

    Guest speaker for this year’s event will be Marian Wright Edelman, Founder and President of the Children’s Defense Fund, has been an advocate for disadvantaged Americans for her entire professional life. A graduate of Spelman College and Yale Law School, Edelman was the first black woman admitted to the Mississippi Bar and directed the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund office in Jackson, Mississippi. She has received over a hundred honorary degrees and many awards including the Albert Schweitzer Humanitarian Prize, the Heinz Award, a MacArthur Foundation Prize Fellowship, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award, and the Robert F. Kennedy Lifetime Achievement Award for her writings which include: Families in Peril: An Agenda for Social Change; The Measure of Our Success: A Letter to My Children and Yours, Lanterns: A Memoir of Mentors, I’m Your Child, God: Prayers for Our Children; I Can Make a Difference: A Treasury to Inspire Our Children; and The Sea Is So Wide and My Boat Is So Small: Charting a Course for the Next Generation. She is married to Peter Edelman, a Professor at Georgetown University Law Center. They have three sons and four grandchildren.

    William Smith

    Meet William Smith, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to William Smith. William teaches second grade and serves as a lead teacher at Lonsdale Elementary School. Previously, William was a classroom teacher at Inskip Elementary School. In 2016, he was named Knox County Schools Elementary Teacher of the Year. William has a bachelor’s degree in human ecology and a master’s degree in child and family studies from UT.

    William is one of 14 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, William will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, William will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations William for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    Rocky Top 50th Anniversary

    50th Anniversary of “Rocky Top” Inspires New Student Designed Merchandise

    The Rocky Top Institute is celebrating the anniversary of “Rocky Top” in the best way possible; by releasing merchandise designed by its own students.  Students enrolled in the Retail and Consumer Design program within the Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management Department were involved in designing new merchandise inspired by the Bryant’s song, “Rocky Top” to commemorate the celebration of its 50th anniversary.

    Read this Tennessee Today article featuring students involved in the design, the history behind it and how the Rocky Top Institute partnered with the Bryant’s has provided unique design opportunities for students.

    Be sure to shop Walmart and other area vendors to grab your anniversary merchandise; also coming to the Vol Shop soon!

    coe front door

    Welcome Back!

    Welcome to the Fall, 2017 semester from the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences. Here’s a few helpful hints to assist in navigating our college on your first few days.

        HPER Building     jhb building      bailey   

    Our college is spread among four buildings;

    • Philander P. Claxton Building-C
    • Health, Physical Education & Recreation-HPER
    • Jessie Harris Building-JHB
    • Jane and David Bailey Education Building-BEC

    • The Claxton Complex consists of two buildings connected by a breezeway; the Bailey Education Building and the Philander P. Claxton Building
    • Classrooms starting with “A” are located in the Bailey Education side of the complex
    • Classrooms starting with “C” are located in the Philander Claxton side of the complex
    • The Office of Advising and Student Services is located at A332 Bailey Education Building.
    • The Dean’s office is located at 335 Claxton building
    • Computer labs are located at:
      • BEC A401
      • BEC A117
      • C427 (inside the C424 Suite-ISC)
      • JHB 24B
      • HPER 142
      • HPER 360

    If you have any other questions, don’t hesitate to stop and ask one of our friendly faculty or staff!  They’ll be glad to help you out!  Good luck in your studies!

     

    Molly Rice

    Meet Molly Rice, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to Molly Rice.  Molly is the assistant principal at Sam Houston Elementary School in Maryville. Prior to this appointment, she had been a classroom teacher at Sam Houston Elementary, serving third and fourth grades. Molly began her teaching career in Westmoreland, Kansas. She has a bachelor’s degree in education and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from UT.

    Molly is one of 14 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Molly will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Molly will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations Molly for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    April Partin

    Meet April Partin, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to April Partin.  April is an assistant principal at Green Magnet Academy. Previously, April served as an assistant principal at A. L. Lotts Elementary School. She also taught third- and fifth-grade students as a classroom teacher at A. L. Lotts and served as a lead teacher. April has a bachelor’s degree in communications and a master’s degree in elementary education from UT, as well as an Education Specialist degree in educational administration and supervision from Lincoln Memorial University.

    April is one of 14 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, April will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, April will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations April for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    student services

    CEHHS Offers Walk-In Advising Hours for Fall

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences is offering walk-in advising hours for students the first week of classes, August 21-25.  Hours will be:

    August 21 – 8-11:30  *Note-Closed for Eclipse Viewing

    August 22 – 8-11:30, 1-3:30

    August 23 – 8-11:30, 1-3:30

    August 24 – 8-11:30, 1-3:30-Only for NON-Teacher Ed Students

    August 25 – 8-11:30 ONLY

    The CEHHS Office of Advising and Student Services is located at 332 Bailey Education Complex, 1122 Volunteer Boulevard, Knoxville, TN  37996.  You can reach them by phone at 865-974-8194.  Appointments prior to these walk-in dates can be made by phone or via their website.

    Oscar Osorio

    Meet Oscar Osorio, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to Oscar Osorio.  Oscar is the assistant principal at Union Grove Middle School in Blount County. Prior to this appointment, he taught seventh and eighth grade science and served on the leadership team at Heritage Middle School. Before joining Blount County Schools in 2000, Osorio began his teaching career in Miami, Florida. Osorio has a bachelor’s degree from Florida International University as well as master’s degrees in science education and educational administration, supervision, and leadership from Nova Southeastern University.

    Oscar is one of 14 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Oscar will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Oscar will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations Oscar for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    David T. Bailey

    David T. Bailey, Dedicated College Supporter, Passes

     

    David T. Bailey, Knoxville businessman, generous supporter, and dear friend passed away early this morning.  He was 90.

    Bailey, who lived in Knoxville, is the largest supporter of the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences.  In recognition of his generosity and commitment to the preparation of teachers, The University of Tennessee Board of Trustees voted to name the Graduate School of Education in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences for David T. Bailey at their March meeting.  He has provided financial support for the college and scholarships for future educators to help them make a difference in the lives of students in Knoxville and across the state.

    Bob Rider, dean of the college said, “His dedication to our teacher education students, and in turn to the thousands of children whose lives they will touch, is beyond reproach. Mr. Bailey’s name will forever be etched on the walls of our graduate school and in the minds and hearts of the many students who will benefit from his philanthropy.”

    Bailey is a 1950 alumnus of UT’s Haslam College of Business and played for the Volunteer football and golf teams during his time on Rocky Top. He became a successful business executive and a benefactor to the university and the community.

    “The impact of opportunities afforded to students and faculty of our renamed graduate school as a result of Mr. Bailey’s generosity will ripple through their lives and the lives of those with whom they work throughout their careers as educators,” said Susan Benner, associate dean of the college and director of the graduate school.

    In 2007, the Claxton Addition wing of the college’s Claxton Education Building was renamed the Jane and David Bailey Education Complex in honor of Bailey and his wife.

    Bailey’s consistent education-focused generosity leaves a rich legacy to honor this deserving man.  Our thoughts are with his family.

    Bailey GSE Orientation Flyer

    Bailey Graduate School of Education Orientation Extends Registration

    The David T. Bailey Graduate School of Education has EXTENDED the registration date for their orientation session.  New students are welcome to attend on August 16th from 3:00-5:00 P.M.  The event will be held in the Plant Biotechnology Building located at 2505 E. J. Chapman Drive, Rooms 156/157.  This location is at the west end of campus near the University Commons. Representative from several UT departments will be at the orientation to answer your questions.  Please RSVP for this event to Diane Booker by email or calling 865-974-6638.  The David T. Bailey Graduate School of Education is looking forward to having you on campus with us this fall!

    Spencer Long

    Meet Spencer Long, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to Spencer Long.  Spencer is an assistant principal and athletic director at Karns High School. Spencer previously taught AP biology and anatomy and physiology at Halls High School, where he also served as a lead teacher. He began his teaching career at Jefferson County High School. Spencer has a bachelor’s degree in biology for health sciences from Carson-Newman University.

    Spencer is one of 14 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Spencer will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Spencer will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations Spencer for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    Pat Legacy of Love

    “Pat: A Legacy of Love”

     
    Pat Head Summitt, the coach, the woman, the legend. We all know her name and the influence she had upon women’s basketball in East Tennessee.  But there’s more to her story; a story that reaches as far away as Iraq.

    Sarah Hillyer & Ashleigh Huffman, UT graduates, co-founders and directors of the Center for Sport, Peace, and Society asked Summitt for help for the Iraq women’s basketball team and like Pat always did, she gave. Through equipment donations and an invitation to one of her basketball camps, Pat changed the lives of these women; empowering them to be leaders, to change lives and communities, leading them to become a new generation of change-makers through sports.

    Coaching Change and espnW present “Pat: A Legacy of Love,” a documentary which shares the story of Pat’s role in women’s basketball in Iraq.  The orange carpet premiere is Thursday, September 7th, 7:00 P.M. at the Bijou Theatre.  Sponsors include WBIR-TV, B97.5, The Center for Sport Peace and Society, The Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame, Bandit Lites, and The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences. Robin Wilhoit, WBIR-TV, will emcee the event.

    For event information and tickets, please visit PatLegacyOfLove.com. A portion of the proceeds will go to the Pat Summitt Foundation.

     

     

    Sponsor Thank You

     

    Anita Johnson, 2017-18 Fellow

    Meet Anita Johnson, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to Anita Johnson.  Anita serves Austin-East High School as an administrative assistant. She served for many years as a secondary English teacher and teacher mentor at Bearden High School, and before that at Oak Ridge High School. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Florida State University.

    Anita is one of 14 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Anita will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Anita will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations Anita for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    Rachel Hodges, 2017-18 Fellow

    Meet Rachel Hodges, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to Rachel Hodges. Rachel is a secondary English teacher and classroom support coach at Union County High School, where she has taught since 2013. She has served as a professional learning committee leader for the past few years, and sits on the school leadership committee. Hodges has a bachelor’s degree in political science from UT and earned her teacher licensure through a post-baccalaureate program at Lincoln Memorial University.

    Rachel is one of 14 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Rachel will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Rachel will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations Rachel for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    gse orientation

    Bailey Graduate School of Education to Host Orientation for New Students

    The David T. Bailey Graduate School of Education will host an orientation session for new students on August 16th from 3:00-5:00 P.M.  The event will be held in the Plant Biotechnology Building located at 2505 E. J. Chapman Drive, Rooms 156/157.  This location is at the west end of campus near the University Commons. Representative from several UT departments will be at the orientation to answer your questions.  Please RSVP for this event to Diane Booker by August 1st.  The David T. Bailey Graduate School of Education is looking forward to having you on campus with us this fall!

    Welcome!

    CEHHS Welcomes Two New Members to Administrative Office

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences welcomes two new members to our Administrative Office.

    Ami McBrideCEHHS welcomes Ami McBride as the new Budget Director.  Prior to joining CEHHS, she was the Business Manager for the Tickle College of Engineering’s Nuclear Engineering department for three years.  Prior to moving to Tennessee, Ami was the Vice President for Finance at Baker College of Cadillac in Michigan for nine years.  She held many accounting roles in both manufacturing and construction industries that spanned 16 years.  Ami obtained her MBA from Lake Superior State University, her BBA in accounting from Baker College of Cadillac, and her BBA in management from Davenport University.

    CCourtney HolbertEHHS also welcomes Courtney Holbert, our new Director of External Funding.  Prior to joining CEHHS, she worked in the local nonprofit arena for 10 years and was a Pre-Award and Subaward Coordinator in the Office of Sponsored Programs for The University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture for six years. She earned her Master’s Degree from The University of Tennessee in Social Work with a concentration in Management and Community Practice. It was in College that Courtney wrote her first successful grant proposal and has never looked back. Securing external funding for local programs or faculty in higher education has been her passion ever since. Courtney is an active member of the National Council of University Research Administrators where she often presents on topics related to professional development and excellent customer service in research administration.

    Welcome to the CEHHS family! We all look forward to working with you!

    top 25 logo

    CEHHS Sport Management Program Ranked in Top 25 in the World; Fifteenth in the US

     
    The Sports Management Master’s Program has been ranked 24th in the world by the SportBusiness Group; a company which offers expert analysis for confident decision-making.  The program was also ranked in the top fifteen in North America. The 2017 rankings were based upon student satisfaction, employment, course leaders, domestic/international performance, gender as well as other factors.

    The Sport Management Master’s program is in the Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies program in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences.  Students graduating have secured positions coast to coast based upon the quality of this program.  Check out the Tennessee Sport Management page on Facebook to view announcements of positions secured by graduates from the program.

    Congratulations to the Sports Management Master’s Program for your recognition!

    coloring pages

    Coloring is Not Just for Kids

     
    Just ask Joy Bertling in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences.  An assistant clinical professor in Art Education in the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education, Bertling says coloring has more benefits than just the finished piece of art.

    Check out this great interview on Live at Five at 4:00 as Bertling discusses the benefits of coloring the new Vol-themed coloring pages.  These pages can be printed directly from the UT website or copies can be picked up in our Dean’s suite.

     

    Shaunna Foster, 2017-18 Fellow

    Meet Shaunna Foster, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to Shaunna Foster.  Shaunna is an instructional coach who has served Green Magnet Academy and Chilhowee Intermediate School. Shaunna was previously a teacher at Belle Morris Elementary School for several years after a professional job in the private sector. She has a bachelor’s degree in business management from Austin Peay State University as well as master’s degree in curriculum and instruction and an Education Specialist degree in educational administration and supervision from Lincoln Memorial University.

    Shaunna is one of 14 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Shaunna will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Shaunna will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations Shaunna for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    steve winfree

    Baseball Card Holds Answer to Sport Management Graduate’s Dream

     

    Steve Winfree, a.k.a. the Knoxville Kidney Guy, received the news that his greatest dream was about to come true.  He was in line to receive a donor kidney from none other than his wife.

    Steve, a 2007 graduate of the Sports Management program in Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sports Studies, has been battling chronic kidney disease for fourteen years, along with gout and Type 1 Diabetes.  He has been on the transplant list since his diagnosis following a routine pre-season physical to play college basketball in 2003.  Steve’s alarming blood pressure reading led to a diagnosis of chronic kidney disease. His three combined diseases make him one of the most distinct cases in the world.  Balancing the kidney disease and an allergy to the only medication which would relieve his gout, Steve began dialysis as a last resort until a kidney transplant could be found.

    And who else but his loving wife, Heather, held the answer to his dream.  After being tested as a possible match, the touching reveal of her results leaves Steve in tears.

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences wishes you the best of luck and a successful transplant Steve.  We will have you in our thoughts as well as your wife, Heather, during this next step in your battle against kidney disease. Follow Steve’s story on Twitter @Steve_Winfree as he shares his story and to raise awareness about organ donation.  You may also learn more about Steve’s journey on his blog and how he has turned his battle into a way to encourage other chronic disease patients.

    frank romanelli

    1976 Home Economics PhD Graduate to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award

     
    Frank Romanelli, graduate from the department of Home Economics (Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management) is to be honored at the Michigan State University College of Business’ homecoming event.  He will be presented with the  2017 Lifetime Academic Achievement Award from their hospitality’s business alumni board.

    Romanelli, a 1976 PhD graduate from the University of Tennessee, was instrumental in starting three restaurant management departments at colleges and universities in Texas as well as a hospitality management department at an Ohio University.  He was the director/professor of the first Texas Restaurant Association-sponsored restaurant management department at the University of Houston.

    Frank and his wife, Peggy, now reside in Venice, Florida.

    Rukiya Foster, 2017-18 Fellow

    Meet Rukiya Foster, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to Rukiya Foster. Rukiya is a Spanish teacher and World Languages Department head at Austin-East Magnet High School. Previously, Rukiya taught Spanish at Farragut High School. She has been involved with the Project GRAD summer institute and serves as the administrative coordinator for Austin-East Roadrunner football. Rukiya has a bachelor’s degree in Spanish and a master’s degree in secondary education from UT.

    Rukiya is one of 14 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Rukiya will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership. Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership. Upon successful completion of the program, Rukiya will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations Rukiya for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    Pipes Students Camp 2017

    PIPES: Possibilities in Post-Secondary Education and Sciences Hosted Summer Camp

     
    The PiPES: Possibilities in Post-Secondary Education and Sciences program just concluded their second summer program June 6-8, 2017.  PiPES partners with 10th and 11th graders from Campbell and Union County schools to provide post-secondary and STEMM (science, technology, engineering, math, and medical) awareness activities. As part of the PiPES program, rising juniors and seniors can apply to attend a three-day summer camp program held on campus.  Throughout the week, 51 students had the opportunity to explore STEMM labs, engage in team-building activities, learn about UT and postsecondary options, and hear from UT undergraduates who serve as near-peer mentors. Five returning campers from year 1 also visited the CURENT labs and attended a physics lecture.

    Through the program, PiPES students are provided college-going awareness information with the intent to break down the college-going barriers normally found among rural Appalachian youth.  Financial planning, how to navigate the application process and involving parents in the process are items addressed.  The summer program allows them the experience of visiting a college campus to help break down more of the barriers.

    PiPES is made possible by a Science Education Partnership Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and seeks to make a positive difference in East Tennessee by providing opportunities for tenth- and eleventh-grade students in Campbell and Union Counties to explore STEMM careers and to promote college awareness.

    stacked luggage

    Graduate Student Senate Travel Fund Deadline

    The Graduate Student Senate offers travel awards to advance the interests of UTK graduate and professional students and promote the research by easing their financial burden of travel.

    The CEHHS Graduate Student Senate Travel Fund applications for travel between September 1, 2017 and December 31, 2017 are due in Dr. Susan Benner’s office by Monday, August 21, 2017.

    In order to ensure these applications are considered for award, please make sure to:

    1. Students obtain both department head and advisor signatures before submitting
    2. Do not staple the forms
    3. TURN YOUR APPLICATION IN ON TIME!  Applications submitted after the deadline will not receive consideration.

    More information is available here.  ***NOTE-even though this site states that the applications are to be submitted online, they must first be sent to Dr. Benner for approval.

    Michelle Clayton, 2017-18 Fellow

    Meet Michelle Clayton, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to Michelle Clayton. Michelle serves West High School as an administrative assistant. She has significant school leadership experience, having served as the correctional principal at the Mountain View Youth Development Center and as teaching principal for the New Pathways Academy at the Florence Crittenton Agency. Michelle also taught at Richard Yoakley Alternative School. She has a bachelor’s degree in secondary education and history from the University of South Alabama and a master’s degree in educational administration from UT.

    Michelle is one of 14 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Michelle will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Michelle will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations Michelle for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    cyclists

    Sport Management Students Assisted With USA Cycling National Road Championship

    Undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in Recreation Sports Management (RSM) classes through the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sports Management (KRSS) this summer had the opportunity to work with the USA Cycling National Road Championship.  The Professional Road & Time Trial National Championships took place on June 24 & 25 in Knoxville and students, under the guidance of Jim BeMiller’s event management classes RSM 370 & 570, got hands on experience working with the event.  The event attracted the top American cyclists who competed on the equivalent to a national championship-level course for the road championships.  This event determined the men’s and women’s national champions for time trial and road course.

    The Recreation Sports Management program through KRSS offers both undergraduate and graduate degrees.  The programs prepare new professionals to enter the parks, recreation, tourism, and related professions. The program emphasizes the experiential education approach to professional preparation.

    More information about the event can be watched here.  Additional photos and details are also featured in this Knoxville News Sentinel article. 

     

     

     

    2017-TF-winner

    Jared Prescott Receives 2017 Division I Track & Field Excellence in Communications Award

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences congratulates Jared Prescott, named recipient of the 2017 Division I Track & Field Excellence in Communications Award.  “This award recognizes athletics communications representatives at conferences and/or schools who have committed to outstanding coverage and support of collegiate track and field” and is selected by the staff at the USTFCCCA (U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association) national office.

    Jared, a second-year graduate assistant in the Athletics Department working in Media Relations is a 2017 graduate from the Sport Management Master’s program in the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies.

    Read more about Jared’s award and the path that led him to this accomplishment.

    Justin Kaewnopparat

    RHTM Student Recognized With Personal Hooding Ceremony

    While graduation dates usually fall in May and December, that timeline doesn’t always coincide with the plans of all our students.  Meet Justin Kaewnopparat, a Hospitality and Tourism student from the Department of Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences.  Justin just completed his PhD last week; not in time to join the hooding ceremony in May.  Since he is attending the University of Tennessee under the support of his home government in Thailand, Justin will not be able to return in December to attend his “official” hooding ceremony.  So what does our college do?  Host his own personal hooding ceremony!

    Justin was hooded during the ceremony by his department head, Ann Fairhurst, with the assistance of one of his committee members, Stefanie Benjamin.  Justin, a former lecturer at Bangkok University, will take his education and return to Thailand to teach and share the wealth of knowledge he acquired during his program here.

    And of course, he can’t leave without a proper lesson in how to fold his hood!


    Riley Brewer, 2017-18 Fellow

    Meet Riley Brewer, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to Riley Brewer. Riley is a master teacher at Carter High School, where she provides instructional coaching support to teachers as well as developmental evaluative feedback.  She previously served as an English teacher for grades 10 through 12 and as a mentor teacher at Carter High School,.  She began her teaching career at Rhea County High School.  Riley has a bachelor’s degree in secondary education English from Tennessee Technological University.

    Riley is one of 14 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Riley will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Riley will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations Riley for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    road

    RHTM Assistant Professor Offers Road Trip Advice for Summer

     

    Stephanie Benjamin, assistant professor in Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management (RHTM), was consulted for her expert advice via WalletHub, a website “dedicated to helping people attain top WalletFitness™ so they may enjoy life instead of worrying about money.”  In this 2017’s Best and Worst States for Summer Road Trips, Benjamin is consulted as a source expert with advice and responses to questions about road trips this summer.  Benjamin’s background includes research interest in cultural and historical landscapes regarding heritage tourism in the U.S. South and is devoted to sustainable tourism through planning, education, and development.

    Check out Benjamin’s recommendations including budget saving tips, best states for road trips, and factors affecting those choices.

    Wallethub LogoStephanie Benjamin

    blueberries on the bush

    Blueberry Falls, a Hidden Gem Outside CEHHS

    Walk out the side doors of the Claxton Complex toward the Haslam Business Building and stroll down the walkway toward Neyland Stadium and you will find a hidden gem. Lush landscaping and a peace waterfall cascade down the busy walkway. The campus oasis is called Blueberry Falls and we have UT faculty member in the Haslam College of Business and his wife to thank for bringing a little nature to our city campus.

    Ernie Cadotte, the Haslam College’s John W. Fisher Professor of Innovative Learning, made the suggestion of replacing what was once a tennis court with a beautifully landscaped park when the site was under renovation.  As a result, Blueberry Falls has become one of the most photographed places on campus.  But where did the name come from?  If you look closely, you will find the answer.  Included in the design are over sixty blueberry bushes, currently bearing fruit, for everyone to enjoy in June.

    In the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences, we strive to enhance the quality of life through research, outreach, and practice. The generous donation from the Cadotte’s has ensured that our whole campus has a beautiful park to enjoy and to enhance our daily lives. For the Cadotte’s it’s about sharing their passion for nature and beautifying a campus that they love. But we are the luckiest ones because it’s right outside our doors!

    Thank you to Ernie and Bonnie Cadotte for your generous gift which will continue to give year after year, enhancing our lives with the beauty of nature and, in June, a healthy addition to our lunches too!

    Blueberry Falls

    Jamie Bowman, 2017-18 Fellow

    Meet Jamie Bowman, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to Jamie Bowman. Jamie is an assistant principal at Horace Maynard Middle School in Union County.  She previously served as an instructional facilitator and sixth grade English/Language Arts teacher at Maynard Middle.  Jamie has a bachelor’s degree in political science from UT as well as a Master of Education degree in administration and supervision from Lincoln Memorial University.

    Jamie is one of 14 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Jamie will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Jamie will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations Jamie for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    Mary Ann Sparks

    CEHHS Alumna Retires from Wilson County Schools

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences (CEHHS) congratulates Mary Ann Sparks, a CEHHS graduate with thirty-four years of service. Sparks’ career began with five years in Blount County (1975-80), then a transfer and move to Nashville with her husband.  After taking seven years to be a stay-at-home Mom,  Sparks began teaching in Wilson County in 1987 and has remained there until her upcoming retirement.  Her career has included teaching second grade, serving as an assistant principal, and ends with her current position as Wilson County Schools as Deputy Director of Human Resources.

    In the schools for thirty-four years, Sparks has experienced significant changes in the system.  From her first day in the classroom, she knew that was her home.  She was named “Teacher of the Year” twice and will miss her students. Ending her career in the administrative side of the system, Sparks has watched as new growth presented new challenges. Former students who visit are always welcome.   “All of them are special!”

    Read more about Sparks’ career and how teaching was just the “fit” for her.  For more information on becoming a teacher, receiving certification, and/or licensure, be sure to check with our Office of Advising and Student Services in CEHHS!

    Photo credit:  The Wilson Post

    zach stipe

    CEHHS Alumnus Named Director of Football Communications

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences is very excited for one of our alumnus, Zach Stipe.  Zach, a 2011 graduate from the Sport Management master’s program located in the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies, has been appointed as Director of Football Communications.  During the pursuit of his master’s, Zach worked on the UT media relations staff and we are happy about his return to the university.

    Previously Zach worked with several sports, including Lady Vols basketball.  This new position will allow him the opportunity to work closely with head coach Butch Jones to implement and execute communications strategies aimed at promoting and publicizing Volunteer Football.

    Welcome home Zach!  Read more about Zach’s appointment and the experience he brings to the position.

    Megan Blevins, 2017-18 Fellow

    Meet Megan Blevins, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to introduce you to Megan Blevins. Megan, a school administrator at Mooreland Heights Elementary School, has been with Knox County Schools since 2007. She has broad experience as a classroom teacher, having first taught first and second grade at Ritta and Carter Elementary Schools and as an ESL teacher at several schools. She has also served in the system-wide role of district lead teacher. Megan has a bachelors degree in elementary education and a master’s in teaching degree from the University of Arkansas.

    Megan is one of 14 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Megan will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Megan will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

    Congratulations Megan for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Center For Leadership Academy Fellows!

    coleman

    Coleman Named South Region Runner of the Year

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences congratulates Christian Coleman, junior in Recreation and Sports Management in the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sports Studies, named as the South Region Runner of the Year. The award was presented by the U.S. Track and field and Cross Country Coaches Association at their regional awards Sunday.

    Coleman won the SEC Championship in both the 100m and 200m dashes and by doing so, became the first collegian to ever run record wind-legal times under 10 seconds in the 100m and under 20 seconds in the 200m on the same day. His marks, 9.97 and 19.98 were the nation’s best times when he recorded them. He also earned the 2017 SEC Commissioner’s Trophy as the high point scorer at the SEC Championship.

     

     

    2017-18 leadership fellows

    2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows Announced

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences is proud to announce the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Class of Fellows.  These fellows, chosen for the 8th year of the academy, prepares talented educators from East Tennessee to become school principal through a full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship as part of the Center for Educational Leadership based in the Department of Educational Leadership & Policy Studies.

    Read more about the academy and the fellows chosen for this year’s class. 

    Congratulations to our new fellows!

     

    Commencement Inspiration from Dr. Sarah Hillyer

     

    On Friday, May 12th, 550 College of Education, Health, and Human Science (CEHHS) students walked across the stage at Thompson Boling Arena to receive their diplomas, shook hands with Dean Rider, and headed out into the world to enhance the lives of others. We could not be more proud of this year’s graduating class!

    The graduates also received inspiration, advice, and instructions for an awesome College handshake from Dr. Sarah Hillyer, an alumna of CEHHS and the Director of the Center for Sport, Peace & Society at The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

    Transcript

    Congratulations! What a day! What a moment! What a memory!

    Thank you for such an incredibly warm and kind introduction and for the opportunity to spend the next hour – KIDDING – 12 minutes – here with you today.

    Today, graduates, some of you will be graduating Summa Cum Laude, others will receive the honor of Magna Cum Laude or Cum Laude, and the rest of you – just like me back in 2010 – will graduate: “Thank you Laude!” “Thank. You. Laude.”

    To President DiPietro, Interim Provost Zomchick, Dean Rider, the Dean’s Board of Advisors, and to our brilliant faculty and staff, it is a true honor to be with you and all of our alumni, special guests, family members, and friends who are gathered here today. Most of all, it is an incredible privilege to be here with you: the ‘full of unique and incredible human potential’ – class of 2017!!!!

    So, what do you say we get this celebration started? To do so, we’d like to start by teaching you our very own 2017 College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences Graduation Celebration Handshake. Yes, it is a thing – well, starting today it’s a thing. Dean Rider, can you help me? Thank you!

    Graduates and distinguished guests, the official handshake goes like this – Dean Rider and I will demonstrate – then ALL of us will do it together. If we can pull this off, not only will 2017 be the year we broke the Guinness World Record for the largest human letter – #thankyou Al Roker and The Today Show at NBC, we could also set the record for the largest (and maybe only) commencement ceremony handshake.

    Ok, it goes like this:

    • Front
    • Back
    • Up
    • Down
    • Pound
    • Forearm
    • Shoot a Jumper

    One more time – and for any non-basketball players in the arena, the “swish” part is in honor of our forever-loved and respected Lady Vol Basketball Coach, Pat Summitt.

    Ok, again:

    • Front
    • Back
    • Up
    • Down
    • Pound
    • Forearm
    • Shoot a Jumper

    Ok, everyone get a partner – students, faculty, parents, distinguished guests – everyone – ok, do we think we can create the world’s largest (and maybe first) graduation handshake?! Ready? Go. Thank you! Well done!

    Research. As you know, research counts for a lot on our campus, so let’s dive right into the very scientific research I conducted……….on Instagram.

    My research sought to answer 2 questions:

    1.  What makes a commencement speech memorable?
    2. What makes a commencement speech meaningful?

    From the research, I will highlight 2 interesting statistics, 2 favorite UT graduation memories and 2 pieces of advice I uncovered: 1.

    Statistic #1: Out of respondents, 70% polled had zero recollection of any part of the speech [reasons not disclosed]. So, this is my purpose statement. To try, to give my best effort, so that maybe you or someone else in your family, other than your mother, will remember just one thing about today’s speech.

    Statistic #2: Out of respondents, 100% said humor was the greatest factor in making a speech memorable. So, this will be my methodology.

    Memory #1: “I threw up when I crossed the stage – and didn’t even receive anything – no one would shake my hand or give me my diploma.”

    Memory #2: I graduated in May 2013 and the only thing I could tell you is that the speaker started the speech by saying it would be short………and then it was not. I’m pretty sure she finished the speech sometime in 2014.

    Advice #1: Keep the speech under 18 minutes – now that you know – you can start the timer.

    Advice #2: Tell a story that is personal, inspiring, and relevant to the next steps in our lives.

    So, based on the findings of my research, I’d like to tell you a personal story that I hope inspires you to be relevant in a world that needs courageous humans to find innovative solutions to the challenges our country and our world faces….all within the next 12 minutes.

    I grew up in Bald Knob, Kentucky – way out in the country – the nearest gas station, corner grocery, any part of civilization was 45 minutes away. We were a moderately poor family but that didn’t stop my parents from working hard to provide me opportunities to pursue my love of sports – basketball, football, baseball. I’ll never forget my mom taking me to the elementary school gym to meet my PE teacher at 6:30 every morning so I could practice free throws for an upcoming Elks Hoop Shoot Contest. I practiced every day for months – I was 8 years old and couldn’t get the ball up to the rim, so my PE teacher taught me the “granny shot.” I was ready – the national competition came to town, to the big capital city of Frankfort, Kentucky. Not unlike most nights, I slept in my gym shorts, ringer T, and tube socks. My K-Mart brand Zips high-tops right next to my bed so I could put them on as soon as I woke up.

    I never knew who might be out in my drive-way ready to play one-on-one – Michael Jordan? John Stockton? Larry Bird? Magic Johnson? Or, it could be that Lady Vols Coach Pat Summitt was hiding in the woods like she did sometimes near my house – wearing orange of course – scouting me – seeing if I was Lady Vol quality and if I was willing to work harder than all the other 8 year olds. You can’t imagine how devastated I was year’s later when my parents told me that Coach Summitt was not in our woods recruiting me – but that it was hunters during deer season. Dreams shattered.

    Back to the story: My mom woke me up early that Saturday morning so I could eat a healthy breakfast of fried eggs and bacon and so we could leave early enough to drive into town and find the civic center gymnasium. I was so excited – you know, that nervous kind of excitement – like you want to throw up but in a good way. I felt like my moment was finally here – all the hard work, dedication, sacrifice, commitment – that an 8-year old can make – it was time – time to compete. Something I had never done before, actually. I had only practiced granny-shots with my PE teacher and played basketball at home with my dad.

    We parked and I walked into the gym with my basketball under my arm and a brand-new Kentucky blue polyester warm up suit that my parents bought for this special occasion. There were kids everywhere – basketballs bouncing, the sound of sneakers on the hard wood, laughter, parents and grandparents in the stands. And I froze. For a moment, I froze. I noticed that no one looked like me, no one shot the ball like me, and no one dressed like me. And for the first time I can remember – I was scared, I was embarrassed and I was afraid to fail. At that moment, I took off running across the gym and headed straight for the girls’ bathroom – where I locked myself in a stall, slid down the door, put my hands over my face, and cried uncontrollably.

    I heard my mom’s voice first. She said, “Sarah, honey, what’s wrong?” I said, “Nothing.” [crying] She said, “Can you please come out of the stall so we can talk about it.” I said, “No.” [crying] She said, “But if you don’t, you’ll miss the free-throw competition that you’ve been practicing for.” I said, “No.” [crying] I didn’t hear anything for a while.

    And then. I heard my dad’s voice, right outside my stall….in the girls’ bathroom. He said, “Sarah, honey, what’s wrong?” I said, “Nothing.” [crying] He said, “If you don’t come out of the bathroom, you won’t get to play.” I said, “I don’t want to play today.” [crying] He said, “Why not?” And that was the moment of truth – I had to say what I was feeling out loud and it wasn’t easy….. I said, “Because I am embarrassed and scared and I’m going to lose.” Then my dad asked me a question I will never forget. “Sarah, do you love playing basketball?” “Did God give you the ability and opportunity to play?” “Yes sir.” “And do you think you’ll ever want to play basketball again after today?” “Yes sir.” “Then here are the only 2 options you have: You can come out of the bathroom and try your best or You can never play basketball again.” What? These are the ONLY two options I have? I despised the thought of both of them. Then he said, “You have 30 seconds to decide. “All you have to do is try your best and that’s all we expect of you. We will love you exactly the same – no matter if you win or lose. In life, it’s not about who shoots the best free throws, it’s about: • Facing your fears • Not comparing yourself to others • And finding the courage to try your best.”

    I came out of the girls’ bathroom and competed that day. I made 23 out of 25 free throws – shooting granny style and won my age division. It was the start of a journey that I never imagined. Because of my parents and the opportunities basketball afforded me – I have traveled the world teaching sports – 14 projects in China, 10 in Israel, Turkey, Tunisia, Egypt, Zimbabwe, Palestine, Saudi Arabia – in 2001 I had the opportunity to introduce softball to women in Iran and and even though I never played basketball for the Lady Vols and Coach Summitt, I did have the privilege of working closely with her to develop girls’ basketball in Iraq – thanks to coach Summitt, there are 100’s of orange basketballs from the north to the south of the country and thousands of girls playing basketball now.

    I appreciate my parent’s love and the lessons they taught me that day when they asked me to come out of the girls’ bathroom and compete:

    1. Face your fears
    2. Don’t compare yourself to others
    3. Have the courage to always give your best effort

    In closing, I’d love to leave with you 8 words I hope you never forget (8 to honor the number of championships Pat Summitt won throughout her career) and these words are: “Please, never lock yourself in a bathroom stall” I’ll say them again, “Please, never lock yourself in a bathroom stall.”

    Congratulations again and thank you!

    Amber MacDonald

    Master’s Graduate Student Researches Connection Between Nutrition & Cancer

     
    Amber MacDonald graduates with her degree in cellular molecular nutrition this week from the Department of Nutrition in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences.  Her path to this degree was a life-changing event no one ever wants to face.

    Amber’s main focus during her research has been the link between nutrition and cancer.  She was led to this major by the terminal cancer diagnosis of her father when she was 15. The last step in her educational journey is to take the MCAT, Medical College Admissions Test, and enroll in medical school, Fall, 2018.

    Read more about Amber’s educational journey and her time at the University of Tennessee.

    Amber, CEHHS is proud of you and can’t wait to see what your future holds!!

    Cheek Flyer

    Professor and Chancellor Emeritus to To Teach Critical Issues in Higher Education Class Beginning Fall, 2017

    Jimmy Cheek, Professor and Chancellor Emeritus will be teaching a graduate level course, Educational Leadership & Policy Studies/ELPS 695: Critical Issues in Higher Education, 3 credits, Thursday evenings, 5:45-8:35 pm.

    The course will focus on contemporary issues in American Higher Education.  It will include critical analysis and understanding of the major issues confronting higher education such as undergraduate, graduate, and professional student’s issues; higher education expenditures, revenue, and student debt; issues in governance and administration of higher education as well as internal and external pressures on the institution and it’s leadership, administration and faculty; and an examination of the future of higher education.

    Topics include student debt, tuition and fees, financial aid, scholarships, retention, graduation rate, throughput, diversity and inclusion, the first amendment rights, civility, access, experiential learning, student recruiting and careers. We will also examine issues related to community colleges and universities, Tennessee Promise and Reconnect, and the Complete College Tennessee Act.  Collegiate athletics will also be examined.

    The Chronicle of Higher Education will be used to examine emerging issues and controversies in Higher Education occurring during the course.

    The text is the American Higher Education in Crisis? What Everyone Needs to Know by Goldie Blumenstyk will be used.

    Learn more about Professor and Chancellor Emeritus Cheek by reading his biography.

     

    investing in journey to the top 25

    Join Us on Our Journey to the Top 25

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences enhances lives through research, outreach and practice. Our students are the how a student learns to read, why disabilities don’t define people, how a child is given a voice, how educational leaders are forged, how healthy bodies are made, how women and children are empowered through sports, how cancer can be cured, and how families thrive.  The stories of how and why our students and alumni are enhancing the lives of others are diverse and endless.  With the generosity of our alumni and friends, we’ll continue to develop leaders in and out of the classroom and equip them with the skills and knowledge to have a positive impact in their community and around the globe.

    Our Vision is to create a world that values knowledge, education, and health as key contributors to improved quality of life for all.

    The College has specific funding priorities and an overall goal of $40,000,000. The Journey to the Top 25 will be fueled by the university’s alumni and friends through their support, both as advocates and investors. We invite you to join us on our journey. 

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    Learn more about our specific funding priorities and how your contribution can enhance lives.

    Joy Desensi

    In Memoriam: Joy DeSensi Service Details and An Opportunity to Share Your Memories or Donate to a Scholarship Fund in Her Memory

    Joy DeSensi, UT Chancellor’s Professor Emerita and longtime scholar and practitioner in the field of sport management, passed away April 1, after a courageous battle with cancer. She was 71.

    A visitation will be held today, Tuesday, April 4, from 4 to 8 p.m. at Rose Mortuary, where a rosary service will take place at 4:30 p.m. A Catholic Mass will be held at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 5, at John XXIII University Parish Catholic Center.

    DeSensi’s career at UT spanned nearly 40 years. She served as the associate dean of UT’s Graduate School for five years as well as department head and professor of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences before retiring in May 2015.

    In 2013, the North American Society of Sport Management, of which she was a founding member, honored her with the inaugural diversity award for exceptional contributions to promote diversity and inclusion within NASSM and related sports management disciplines.

    DeSensi served as president of the International Association for the Philosophy of Sport, the National Association for Kinesiology and Physical Education in Higher Education, the Southern Academy of Women in Physical Activity, Sport, and Health.

    DeSensi was a leading figure in advancing women in physical education, sport studies, and kinesiology. She was an author and editor and served on numerous national and international committees.

    She was a shooter on the 1968 Olympic rifle team, a concert pianist, and a trained airplane pilot. Her background as a intercollegiate athlete, coach, official, and national and international sports competitor served as a foundation for her teaching, research, and service interests.

    DeSensi received her doctorate in sport philosophy and administrative theory from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she was named a distinguished alumna. She earned her master’s degree in education from the University of Memphis, and bachelor’s degree in physical education and Spanish from West Liberty University.

    She is one of the authors of Ethics and Morality in Sport Management. Her scholarly interests included the sociocultural issues of sport, the broad aspects of diversity, and ethics in sport management.

    DeSensi earned a number of awards throughout her academic career, including: Scholar Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southern Sport Management Association in 2015; a fellow of the National Association for Kinesiology in Higher Education in 2015; the inaugural diversity award from the North American Society for Sport Management in 2013; the Rachel Bryant Lecture Award from the National Association for Girls and Women in Sport in 2010; the Distinguished Scholar Award from the National Association for Kinesiology in Higher Education in 2010; the Chancellor’s Professorship from UT in 2008; the Angie Warren Perkins Award for Excellence in Governance and Administration from UT in 2007; and the President’s Award from the National Association for Girls and Women in Sport in 2005.

    “Dr. DeSensi was undoubtedly one of the most influential people in my life,” said Ashleigh Huffman, assistant director of UT’s Center for Sport, Peace, and Society. “She was my champion, my role model, and my mentor. I will carry her legacy forward.”

    In lieu of flowers, the family is requesting donations to a UT graduate scholarship fund. Checks can be made payable to the University of Tennessee in honor of the Joy. T. DeSensi Scholarship Fund, Center for Sport, Peace, and Society. For more information, contact center director Dr. Sarah HillyerYou can make online donations to the fund here.  Please select “fund not listed” and please include the name “Dr. Joy DeSensi Scholarship” so that the amount will be directed to the correct fund.

    Friends, family, and colleagues are encouraged to share their photos and memories of DeSensi on the CEHHS tribute page.  See what other people have shared.

    faculty

    Tenure & Promotions Workshops Available

     

    The Office of the Provost is offering two Tenure and Promotion Workshops this spring.  Any College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences faculty preparing for tenure and/or promotion are encouraged to attend. You are not required to sign-up for sessions; just attend the workshop that works best for you.

    April 11 Promotion and Tenure Workshop – faculty/department heads, 9:00-10:30, BCC 102/103/104
    April 12 Promotion and Tenure Workshop – faculty/department heads, 1:30-3:00, BCC 102/103/104
    coleman

    CEHHS Students Qualify for NCAA Indoor Games

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences (CEHHS) has students from the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, & Sport Studies qualified for this year’s NCAA Indoor Championships. Christian Coleman will compete in the 60m & 200m during his third opportunity to compete. Another Kinesiology, Recreation, & Sport Studies student, Chelsea Blaase, qualified for the 500m but will not compete due to injury.

    Read more about these outstanding athletes who call CEHHS their home.  Join us as we wish them the best of luck in the competition March 11.

    CEHHS Congratulates Dixie Thompson, Recipient of the Henry J. Montoye SEACSM Scholar Award

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences would like to congratulate Dixie Thompson, Vice-Provost and Dean of the University of Tennessee’s Graduate School and former Associate Dean, Research and Academic Affairs in our college, named recipient of the Henry J. Montoye award presented by the Southeast Chapter of American College of Sports Medicine (SEACSM) (SEACSM). The award is named for Henry J. Montoye, a former faculty member and internationally know scholar in physical activity and health.

    Thompson received this award based upon her outstanding work in the field of Exercise Science and Sports Medicine.  Thompson, prior to her appointment as an Associate Dean in our college, was a faculty member in the Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sports Studies Department where she began as an assistant professor and leaving as department head before accepting her position as Associate Dean in our College.

    Congratulations Dixie!

    American College of Sports Medicine

    Big Orange Family

    Big Orange Family Campaign

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences encourages you to remember to Give to the Big Orange Family Campaign!  Our college is a unique and important part of the university and each of us are a part of the Big Orange Family.

    So here’s your chance to give to back to your family.  Each gift, no matter how large or small, makes a difference.  You can make a recurring gift, a one-time gift or a matching gift.  This is your chance to help with UT’s Journey to the Top while inspiring research, empowering students, fueling dreams, igniting careers, and energizing our leaders which makes a difference!

    You can give online or through the mailer you received.  But Give Now and help our college reach it’s goal!

    koinonia

    Students Volunteer at Camp Koinonia

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sports Studies associate professor Angela Wozencroft teaches classes in Therapeutic Recreation.  Part of her job also includes serving as the program director for Camp Koinonia; a camp for children ages 7-21 with various intellectual and development disabilities.

    At a camp that has been held annually in Crossville, TN for forty years, students have the opportunity to work with the children on a one-on-one basis as a counselor or activities staff. They gain not only experience working with someone with a disability, but many times a friend for life.  Typically students who attend the camp go through Recrecation/Sports Management 326 class to gain the training and skills needed.

    Read more about the wonderful work that occurs at Camp Koinonia each year and the opportunities it offers students both working at and attending the camp.

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    UT Reading Expert Recommends Books for All Ages to Celebrate Black History Month

    February is Black History Month; an annual celebration of achievements by black Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of African Americans in U.S. History. In honor of this celebration, UT’s Center for Children’s and Young Adult Literature (CCYAL) has compiled a recommended reading list of talented black authors and illustrators.

    Cindy Welch, associate director of the center, feels there are many talented black authors and illustrators which create quality books for our youth. Susan Groenke, associate professor of English Education in the Theory and Practice and Teacher Education department, also serves on the board of the center. CCYAL works in partnership with the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences and the School of Information Sciences in the College of Communications and Information.

    Enjoy Cindy’s recommendations in this TN Today article which includes a mix of books related to music, culture, science, technology, engineering & mathematics.

    leah jenkins

    Retail Consumer Science Student Chosen as a Semi-Finalist in Next Generation Class of 2017

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences congratulates Leah Jenkins, senior in Retail and Consumer Sciences in the Department of Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management for reaching the semi-finals in the National Retail Foundation competition representing the next generation of retail leaders.

    Leah will attend the NRF Foundation Gala in January in New York City where retail executives from 20 companies selected 5 finalists and 25 semi-finalist in the competition.  Leah received a travel scholarship to attend the Student Program at Retail’s Big Show and the gala.

    Good luck Leah!

     

     

    Rachel Rhea, Recipient of Tennessee Art Education Association Higher Education Student Achievement Award

    CEHHS Art Education Student Receives Higher Education Student Achievement Award

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences (CEHHS) congratulates Rachel Rhea, Class of ’16 graduate from Art Education.  Rachel is awarded the Higher Education Student Achievement Award from the Tennessee Art Education Association.

    Rachel was nominated by Clinical Assistant Professor in Art Education from the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education, Joy Bertling.  Bertling recognized Rhea’s outstanding abilities in Art Education and felt she exemplified the qualities and standards of what it means to be a great art educator, going above-and-beyond for her students.

    Rhea now teaches art at Sarah Moore Greene Magnet Academy in Knoxville.

     

     

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    2016 Student Awards Celebration

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences held its 2016 Student Awards Celebration October 27, 2016 at the Holiday Inn, World’s Fair Park.  Recipients, donors, and families were in attendance at the festivities.  The event allowed recipients and their families an opportunity to thank the donors who make these awards possible each year.

    Enjoy this gallery of photos featuring students, families, administration and donors at this year’s event!

    Complete list of 2016 Student Award Recipients

     

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    UT FUTURE Presents Service Learning Poster Presentation

     
    Be sure to stop by the 2nd floor Claxton Commons area on December 1 and check out the Service Learning Poster Presentation.  Students in the Coun 404: FUTURE Service-Learning class for all majors will present their service learning projects; created and implemented for students with intellectual and development disabilities in the FUTURE program.

    FUTURE is a two-year course of study which empowers students to achieve gainful employment in the community.  A comprehensive transition program for unique and highly motivated young adults whose disabiliuty is characterized by significant limitations in both intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior. FUTURE students typically received special education services while in high school, graduating with either a regular diploma or a special diploma.

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    UT Retail Students to Compete in National Design Competition

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences students of Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management will have an opportunity to showcase their design talents and retail know-how in a student design challenge with a global design brand.

    Robin-Ruth is an international casual lifestyle brand and a leading supplier of fashion worldwide. Through the Student Design League competition, students will submit one of four t-shirt designs selected by public vote.  This submission, along with submissions from five other high-ranking retail programs in the U.S., will be reviewed and an overall winner will be chosen.  The student who submits the winning design chosen for our university will be a offered an interview for one of two internships in Robin-Ruth’s New York City showroom.  Winners will be announced December 1.

    Be sure and vote November 14-20th for UT’s final submission to the competition.

     

     

     

    Gene Fitzhugh

    Fitzhugh Chosen as one of Five Center for Transportation Research Faculty Fellows

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences congratulates Eugene Fitzhugh who was chosen as a 2016-2017 Center for Transportation Research faculty fellow.  Fitzhugh was one of five selected to participate in the program “established in 2014 to foster a community of researchers and educators at UTK who are committed to improving all aspects of transportation.  With this fellowship, CTR recognizes both up-and-coming and established faculty playing leading roles in transportation education and research.”

    Fitzhugh has partnered with Jerry Everett, CTR Director of Research, in writing Safe routes to School curriculum materials and with Chris Cherry, Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, on a research study of electric pedal-assist bikes.

     

    Heidi Stolz

    Halloween by the Numbers-Stolz Offers Halloween Advice

     
    Halloween can become an expensive Holiday with a projected spending of $8.38B by Americans.  That averages out to about $83.93 per American.  Wow, that’s a lot!

    Heidi Stolz, associate professor in the Department of Child and Family Studies, offers her expert advise on WalletHub.Com about Halloween.  Americans, out of the $8.38B spent, will spend $3.14B of that on costumes. In this Halloween featured story, Stolz advises that store-bought costumes can be of the of the biggest money wasters along with offering other helpful tips to make your child’s Halloween fun, healthy, and safe.

     

    Ashley Brown Trentham Endowed Scholarship Recipient

    Trentham Endowed Scholarship Awarded

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences congratulates Ashley Brown, a senior majoring in math for receiving the Brent L. and Rachel W. Trentham Endowed Scholarship for the 2016-17 academic year.  She will complete her VolsTeach apprentice teaching in Spring, 2017.

    The scholarship, established in 2014, recognizes and awards a top student who has demonstrated high-quality teaching skills and commitment to the profession and is enrolled in the VolsTeach Teacher Education program.  The donors, both Brent and Rachel Trentham are UT graduates.

    Pictured are:  Ashley and the Trentham family

    Students in a classroom

    Office of Advising & Student Services to Host Information Session

     
    The Office of Advising and Student Services in the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences will host an information session, “Interested in Becoming a Teacher?”  The session will be Wednesday, November 9 from 4:00-5:15 pm in Bailey Education Complex Room 424.

    The session will cover licensure programs, how and when to apply to the Teacher Education program, Education 100 classes, and the Student Tennessee Education Assocaiation (STEA).

    For more information, contact the CEHHS Office of Advising and Student Services  or call 865-974-8194. Door prizes and refreshments will be provided.

    Boyd Venture Challenge

    Business Plan Competitions Open to CEHHS Students

    The Anderson Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation is excited to announce its fall 2016 business plan competitions: Vol Court and the Boyd Venture Challenge. In past semesters, students from CEHHS have competed in both competitions, and we hope this trend will continue! Below is information about the competitions

    VOL COURT: Begins October 12

    The Vol Court Speaker Series and Pitch Competition kicks off on October 12 at 5:15 p.m. in 104 Haslam Business Building. Vol Court is a six-week entrepreneurial speaker series hosted by the Anderson Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation. The series culminates in a pitch competition where attendees put what they’ve learned to use by pitching their ideas to a panel of judges. Winners of the Vol Court Pitch Competition receive cash, rental space in the UTRF Business Incubator and legal and accounting services. Vol Court is a free event open to all UT students, faculty and staff.  For more information, visit https://tiny.utk.edu/VolCourtFall16.

    BOYD VENTURE CHALLENGE: Application deadline October 17

    The Boyd Venture Challenge is accepting applications now through Oct. 17. Boyd Venture Challenge is a seed fund grant that awards up to $20,000 to startup companies owned by University of Tennessee students. Any legally formed company owned by a UT Knoxville or UT Institute of Agriculture undergraduate, master’s or Ph.D. student is eligible to apply. To date, this fund has awarded $242,000 to 29 startups. For more information on submission requirements, visit https://tiny.utk.edu/BoydFall16.

    If you have any questions, contact Carrie McCamey via email or phone @ 865-974-5126.

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    Student/Faculty Research Awards Available

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Science’s Student/Faculty Research Awards (formerly Professional Development Awards) are now available.  The awards are to be used to advance the work of both faculty and graduate students.  They are also to give students experience writing grants, and foster the mentoring relationship between faculty and graduate students.  Grants of up to $5,000 will be awarded to student/faculty pairs who submit proposals for funds to support research or creative projects.  The funds may be used to purchase supplies needed for research, travel to work in other laboratories, libraries, for specialized training or for other ways, as long as the outcome will be the professional development of the graduate student and the advancement of an identified research/creative agenda of both the student and faculty member.  Special consideration will be given to students and faculty who do not have current, or recent institutional support for their research.  If you are interested in applying, please submit the following by Friday, October 21st for submission to the Graduate School by October 28th.  Graduate School of Education (GSE) student/faculty members should submit their proposal electronically to dbooker@utk.edu for Dr. Susan Benner.  All other departments should submit their proposal electronically to Kayla Whitt (kwhitt@utk.edu) for Dr. Jeff Fairbrother.

    Each proposal must include and be arranged in the following order:

    –Cover sheet (available at this link: (http://gradschool.utk.edu/documents/2016/09/studentfaculty-research-award.pdf)  Be sure to include the name and phone number of a departmental contact who will managing the funds.  If the Faculty PI is

    not the Student PI’s major professor, provide the name of the major professor, and indicate that the major professor has endorsed the proposal.

    –A narrative of no more than 1000 words (excluding references).  Should be written for an educated, non-specialist audience and must include a clear explanation of methodology and expected outcomes.

    –A statement of how the project will advance the professional development of the student PI (250 words or fewer).

    –A statement of how the project is related to the faculty PI’s expertise and research agenda (250 words or fewer).  If the faculty PI has extramural or intramural funding, please indicate the difference between this request and the funded

    research.

    –An itemized budget for the amount requested.  Requests should be for amounts between $1,000 and $5,000.  Be sure to indicate a projected timeline for use of the funds.

    –Any documentation of an invitation or host institution support.

    –CV of the faculty member (Limit to 5 pages – include current funding) and the graduate student (Limit to 2 pages).

    –Endorsement letters from both department head and dean (Dr. Benner will provide endorsement letters for Child & Family Studies; Educational Leadership & Policy Studies; Educational Psychology & Counseling; and, Theory & Practice in Teacher

    Education.  Dr. Fairbrother will provide endorsement letters for faculty in Nutrition; Public Health; Kinesiology, Recreation & Sport Studies; and, Retail, Hospitality & Tourism Management).

     

    Keith Carver

    ELPS Alumni Recommended as Next Chancellor for UT Martin

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences congratulates alumni, Keith Carver, recommended as the next chancellor to lead the University of Tennessee at Martin.  Carver has served as executive assistant to UT President Joe DiPietro since 2011. The UT Board of Trustees will vote during their October 13-14 meeting on this decision.

    Carver earned his bachelor’s degree in Sociology at the University of Memphis, his master’s in college student personnel and educational leadership through the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in our college, and his doctorate in philosophy at UT Knoxville.  We wish Carver the best of luck in his  new appointment.

    playground equipment

    Longer Recess=Better Learning

     
    Dawn Coe, associate professor in Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies, feels that the activity children get during recess can help them not only physically, but mentally as well.  Academics are important but give children a chance to take a break and partake in some sort of physical activity.  The breaks in academics give children a chance to be active which leads to better behavior and attentiveness.

    Enjoy this WVLT-8 story featuring Coe which was filmed with children in our own Early Learning Center.

     

    Billie Grace Goodrich Distinguished Lecture

    GoodrichLogoOn Tuesday, October 4th, 2016, the Graduate School of Education and the College of Education, Health & Human Sciences will host the 2016 Billie Grace Goodrich Distinguished Lecture.  The event is at the Holiday Inn, World’s Fair Park.  Event starts at 5:15 P.M. with a reception and lecture follows at 6 P.M.

    Guest speaker for this year’s event will be Johnnetta Cole. One of the most powerful and well-regarded African American women in the US, Cole has a way with making history. She was the first African American woman president of Spelman College, the first woman ever elected to the board of Coca-Cola Enterprises, and the first African American to serve as chair of the board of United Way of America. In over 40 years in education, she has also served two US Presidents in leadership roles.

    Cole currently serves as the director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art. Since the mid-1980s, Cole has worked with a number of Smithsonian programs. She currently serves on the Scholarly Advisory Board for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. As a scholar, author, and activist for social and economic justice, Cole has spearheaded breakthrough thinking about diversity, leadership for social and economic justice, and women’s issues.

    An inspiring force, Cole rallies everyone to embrace diversity as not only a moral and social value, but as a compelling case for business. She encourages audiences to move beyond the status quo to fully take advantage of the innovative and profitable ideas that stem from a more diverse workforce, membership, and student body. As she notes, “How much better our world would be if each of us respected difference until difference doesn’t make any more difference?”

    Goodrich Lecture Series Sponsors

     

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    weeklys resized

    Center for Sport, Peace, and Society Continue to Empower Women Through Sports

     
    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences has a hidden powerhouse; a group of determined individuals who are not afraid to share their power.  They are the staff of the Center for Sport, Peace, and Society (CSPS).

    Once again, CSPS is helping dreams to become realities for women all across the world.  In this feature story, the co-head coaches of Tennessee Women’s Softball team are helping women in Mexico at a sports clinic realize how important sport can be in their lives.

    Enjoy this feature story from Tennessee Today about the Weekly’s visit to Mexico and their experience leading a sports clinic for women’s softball.  Not only did they assist in leading women to find their inner power, they also experienced the determination of these ladies to make a difference even at a young age. 

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    Three Sport Management Graduates Are Division 1 Athletic Directors

    three athletic directors
    Three graduates from the Sport Management Program in the Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Management have reached monumental positions in their careers.

    John Currie is with Kansas State.  He received his MA in Sports Management in 2003.  He has served as athletic director for the Kansas State program since 2009, turning their program around tremendously.

    Mark Ingram began his appointment as Director of Athletics of the University of Alabama in May, 2015.  He graduated with his BA in sports management in 1996 with minors in both business and psychology.

    David Blackburn is a1990 graduate receiving his BA.  He began his leadership role at the University of Chattanooga as Vice Chancellor and Director of Athletics in April, 2013.

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences is proud of the accomplishments of these alumni.  Great job!

     

     

    public health logo

    Two Public Health Graduate Students Receive Josephine D. Cochran Scholarship

    The University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences Scholarship Committee has chosen Brittney Hardwick and Chelsea Hagan as the recipients of the 2016Josephine D. Cochran Scholarship. Ms. Josephine created this award because she believed education was vital to an individual’s character. She wanted to assist students with a high level of academic success in the areas that were in the former College of Human Ecology.

    Brittney HardwickBrittney Hardwick is currently pursuing a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree with a concentration in Health Policy and Management at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She is also earning a Graduate Certificate in Health Policy and plans to graduate in May of 2017. She sits on the Dean’s Graduate Student Advisory Board as the representative for the UTK Department of Public Health. She is also a member of Tennessee Public Health Association, Public Health Graduate Student Association, and the Inter-professional Training Group, which focuses on providing collaborative care to rural and underserved patients in community clinic settings. She has also worked with Vanderbilt University Medical Center, UT Medical Center, and HCA. Brittney aspires to be a champion for innovative health care policy and quality improvement efforts.

    Chelsea HaganChelsea Hagan is in her second year at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s Master of Public Health (MPH) degree program. Her chosen MPH concentration is in Community Health Education, a calling that she has answered enthusiastically alongside her studies. In her first year, Chelsea facilitated the “My Body, My Future” program to empower adolescent girls at the Boys and Girls Club. She is actively working in the health and wellness field in the Knoxville area serving as a Diabetes Prevention Program Lifestyle Coach at the YMCA, a weight loss intervention coach, and a personal trainer. This fall, she will be leading local high school students as they complete a community health assessment during the ToWeR (Teens Working to Reform) program. After her graduation in May of 2017, Chelsea plans to pursue a career of wellness in the workplace.

     

    male chef

    Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management’s Culinary Institute offers “Become Your Own Chef” Noncredit Courses

    Based in the Department of Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management, the Culinary Institute is offering noncredit courses as a way to “Become Your Own Chef.”  There are eight different selections of classes offered where you can create a themed dinner or project for everyday dining or specific to an event.  Instructors for these courses have a wide variety of experience and talent ranging from the wine industry to culinary instructors at the institute.

    More information on how to get registered for these courses, fees, and location and other helpful information can be found in this Tennessee Today article.  You may also register by calling Marcia Lane in the Department of Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism Management at 865-974-6645.

    presidential honor

    Teachers with Ties to CEHHS Win Presidential Award

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences is celebrating two East Tennessee teachers; one an alumna and one a mentoring teacher for our college, two out of over two hundred honored.

    Mary Vaughan has taught a full range of math subjects at Oak Ridge High School over the last twenty years and currently teaches Algebra 1 and Precalculus Honors.  A National Board Certified teacher, Mary earned her BS and MS degrees in Mathematics Education from our own Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education. 

    Nicole Resmondo, a sixth grade science teacher at Gresham Middle school, serves on the Tennessee State Science Standard Writing Development Team. She is also a mentoring teacher for students through our Vols Teach Program.

    Congratulations to these two ladies!  Check out their story as featured on Wate.Com On Your Side, Channel 6.    Here is the story as featured on Local 8 News.

    Julia Jaekel, Child & Family Studies

    Julia Jaekel Explains Refugee Mother’s Child Care Practices

    Julia Jaekel, Assistant Professor in the Department of Child and Family Studies, explains why the continuation of homeland child caring practices should be important for all refugee mothers.  Featured on the Academic Minute Website, Jaekel discusses the increase in the number of refugees and what that increase means for refugee mothers. Her project, in which she is teamed with colleague Hillary Fouts, aims to investigate traditional infant care patterns that may be protective of preterm infants.

    Enjoy the article featuring an audio discussion with Jaekel and learn more about the importance of these practices and traditions.

    new vols

    Welcome Students!

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences welcome our students on the first day of classes!

    If you are a returning student or a new face to grace our halls, we wish you the best of luck this semester and are here to help in any way we can!

    Just a few helpful hints!

    Student Services (Advising) Center is located in A335 Bailey Education Complex, 974-8194

    Dean’s Suite/Administrative Office is located at 335 Claxton Complex, 974-2201

    Food can be found at the Student Union which includes Subway, Chik-Fil-A, Qdoba, Panda Express, Salad Creations & Starbucks.  There is also a Starbucks in the library and an Einstein’s Bagels in the Haslam Business Building.

    Parking Services is located at 2121 Stephenson Drive, 974-6031.

    Good luck on your first day and don’t hesitate to ask for help if you need it!

    student services

    CEHHS Offers Walk-In Advising Hours

     

    Need advised?

    Forget to make an appointment?  Never fear, your staff of fabulous CEHHS advisors have your back!

    The CEHHS Student Services Center is offering “Walk-In” advising hours the week of August 15-19.  Hours are from 8:30-3:30 each day.

    The Office of Student Services can be reached at 865-974-8194 or at CEHHS Student Services.

    proj GRAD 2016

    Project GRAD Contributes to Illumination Tribute in Odd Fellows Cemetery

     
    The Odd Fellows Cemetery will be honored during an Illumination Tribute on August 12 at 7:00 P.M.  A contributing factor to making it all happen has been the College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences Project GRAD.

    During their 2016 Project GRAD Summer Institute and in years past, students have contributed to the maintenance and cleaning of the Odd Fellows Cemetery.  Along with other volunteer organizations, they helped map the 250 stones which represent only part of the 6,000 graves in the cemetery .

    Odd Fellows Cemetery, located on Bethel Avenue in downtown Knoxville, is one of Knoxville’s first dedicated African-American burial grounds.  The College of Architecture and Design and the Knoxville ReAnimation Coalition will hold the Illumination Tribute on August 12 at 7:30 P.M. in the Cemetery as part of a week-long celebration of Emancipation in Knoxville.

    Learn more about the event to commemorate Emancipation day and to honor the slavery-era men and women buried in Odd Fellows Cemetery. 

    Taylor Phinney

    The Science of Olympians

     

    USA cyclist Taylor Phinney tests the limits of his ability every time he competes in an event.  As one of the top athletes in the world, Phinney followed in the footsteps of his parents which are both Olympic medalists. But is that the only reason he has been successful?David Bassett

    With this great athletic ability comes questions; questions that David Bassett and Scott Conger are trying to answer.  Is it genetics?  Is it starting training at an early age? How can someone run faster and farther than the average person?

    Click here to download full article.
    This article, written by David Bassett, professor and head of our Department of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sports Studies in the University of Tennessee College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences, and Scott Conger, assistant professor in The Department of Kinesiology at Boise State University, explores athletes, their abilities, and what makes it happen.

    Check out Bassett and Jim BeMiller, featured on WBIR.Com as they discuss “The Science of Olympians.”

    The Science of Olympians

    playground equipment

    Pond Gap Elementary, A University-Assisted Community School, Gets New Playground

    Pond Gap Elementary, a University-Assisted Community School (UACS), will have a new playground for students on opening day, August 8.  The playground, made possible by a partnership between the Pond Gap PTA, Rotary Club of Bearden, and Knox County Schools, will serve the school’s 370 students when they return. Countless volunteers have labored in the heat to make this possible.

    As one of the University-Assisted Community Schools, Pond Gap Elementary is near and dear to the heart of Bob Kronick, director of the UACS program.  Pond Gap serves a low-income population and this program has enhanced their interpersonal skills, strengthened their critical thinking, and allowed them to succeed more academically than ever before!

    Read more about how this project was made possible.

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    Center for Children’s and Young Adult Literature Presents Special Workshop

    The Center for Children’s and Young Adult Literature will present a special workshop this Friday, July 15, showcasing the best new books for children and young adults from the past year. The event, in collaboration with the Knox County Public Library, will feature events throughout the day.  More information about registration and the event schedule can be found here.  

    The Center for Children’s and Young Adult Literature’s is a partnership between our college and the College of Communications and Information.  Their mission is to celebrate and promote literature and to encourage reading through outreach to children and their parents, to current and future teachers and librarians, to members of the community, and to scholars and thinkers across disciplines.  The center is under the direction of Susan Groenke, associate professor of English Education in the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education.best of the best

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    Child and Family Studies Student Studies Abroad for Research

    This summer you can find Child and Family Studies (CFS) student, Lauren Bader, conducting research abroad. Bader is currently in the Gamo Highlands in a village called Doko-Zolo.  For her second summer, Bader’s fieldwork consists of researching cultural beliefs of environmental risk and parents as well as gathering information on parents experiences with child loss.  Included in her research, Bader will conduct observations of 1-2 year old Gamo children to investigate how parents’ experiences with child loss relate to their involvement with infants and toddlers.  Bader is working on this project in collaboration with her professor, Hillary Fouts, assistant professor in CFS.

    baderAnd she doesn’t stop there.  In a separate project with Julia Jaekel and Hillary Fouts, Bader will be meeting with local health care professionals in the village and in Arba Minch, the closest town to the village of Doko-Zolo as well as professors from Arba Minch University.  The aim of this project is to investigate traditional infant care patterns that may be protective of preterm infants.

    Bader will return to Knoxville in September. She will be joined by Fouts and Jaekel during part of her time abroad providing her an opportunity to work along side her professors.  She will begin planning future research with their network of collaborators in Doko-Zolo and Arba Minch.

     

    UTK College of Education Health and Human Sciences_WeAreOrlando1

    TPTE 517-Trends and Issues in Education Expresses Support for Orlando

     
    At a time in our society when we are all saddened by the turn of events in Orlando, one instructor has turned educational theory about social justice into practice by displaying support for #WeAreOrlando.  Today students from the Theory and Practice in Teacher Education 517-Trends and Issues in Education class led by Graduate Teaching Associate Beau Whitsett, designed posters to express our college’s support of those involved in Sunday’s tragic event.  The posters are displayed in the main hallway/entryway into our college.

    More information about events and ways to support in the wake of this attack on the LGBTQ community and our nation’s largest mass shooting history can be found on the #WeAreOrlando website.

     

    kids with veggies

    Fit and Healthy Advice for Summer

     
    How do you keep your family fit and healthy this summer?  Lee Murphy, professor in the Department of Nutrition has six tips to help you out.  Some of these tips include a health pantry and simply hydrating often.

    Read more about Murphy’s recommendations to keep your family healthy and fit this summer featured in this Tennessee Today article!

     

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    Center for Sport, Peace, and Society Visits With Leaders and Government Officials About Disability Rights

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences Center for Sport, Peace, & Society has partnered with the U.S. Department of State for the Global Sports Mentoring Program and its Empower Women through Sports and Sport for Community programs. On May 18, they visited with 15 ‪#‎S4C2016‬ emerging leaders and met government officials working in the area of ‪#disability rights‬. The class visited the U.S. Department of State to learn about U.S. disability rights efforts and share their hopes for how they will influence inclusion, accessibility, and sports opportunities in their countries.

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    Fairbrother

    Fairbrother Appointed Interim Associate Dean

    The College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences is pleased to announce the appointment of Jeff Fairbrother as the Interim Associate Dean of Academic and Faculty Affairs in our college.  Fairbrother has served faithfully as Department Head for Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport Studies for the past four years and brings a wealth of experience to the appointment.

    Fairbrother will be serving in interim for the position as Dixie Thompson moves into her new role as Vice Provost and Dean of the Graduate School effective April 1. As Fairbrother serves as interim in this position, David Bassett will fill the position of interim of Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sports Studies.

    Congratulations to all!  Read the article also featured in Tennessee Today making this announcement.

     

    Ms Stewart Card

    CEHHS Art Ed Alumna Named one of the 2016 Knox County Teachers of the Year

     
    Congratulations to Knox County Christenberry Elementary School Art Education Teacher, Jessica Stewart.  Jessica has been named one of the 2016 Teachers of the Year in Knox County for her skills as an exceptional educator.  Jessica is a 2012 MS graduate in Art Education through the Department of Theory and Practice in Teacher Education.

    As Jessica teaches art for fourth and fifth grade students, she provides “a warm and inviting environment where students are encouraged to explore and create art that is personal.”  Jessica teaches art with this philosophy and the students love her.  “Art is the only place that has no wrong answers. There might better some better answers, but no wrong ones. And it’s really freeing, totally safe, and it makes (students) free from failure.”

    Enjoy this article and video interview featuring Jessica in the Knoxville News Sentinel and share Jessica’s love for art and how she encourages that love in her students

     

     

     

     

     

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